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With No Money, How Do I Pay My Attorney to File My Bankruptcy?

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How do I Pay My Attorney for My Bankruptcy?

By, Ginger Kelly, Esq.  April 10, 2018

The other day, a personal friend asked me (for a friend), whether or not they should she use their tax return tax refund to pay down their credit card bills or to replace the old and leaking roof on their home.  Their roof needed repairing badly.  Their credit card debt was very old and the payments were more than they could afford.  Even though I can’t make that final decision for this friend’s friend (or any of my clients), I can advise most folks of their legal options.  When people need to make a choice between a roof over their head or paying credit card bills, one good option available to most everyone is a fresh start.

In many or most situations, bankruptcy can give an individual or a couple, the fresh start they need. If you are in a position where you need to make important decisions like what to pay and what not to pay, like a roof on your home or to repair the vehicle you need to get to work, talk to a good bankruptcy attorney.  Most give free first consultations, like our office. Bankruptcy might be an option for you, or maybe not.  A person hasn’t lost but an hour of their time discussing their options with a good attorney.  Talking to a professional about options for taking care of debt, sometimes gives the clarity you need to make the right decisions for your future.

A client visited me the other day to discuss her situation. Apparently, she had debt exceeding any amount she could pay.  It wasn’t much debt, but it was a lot for her and that is important. Her earnings were barely more than the poverty level.  So while we had a nice hot cup of coffee, we talked about all of her options.  It was a nice pleasant, casual conversation.  I discovered that my client earned too much money to qualify for a free bankruptcy, through legal aid. She was sad and asked me what can be done.

Because her bankruptcy was not complex, I agreed to lower my fee. I gave her my best  fee option. Still, she was worried. Where would she find the money to pay the attorney fee? I asked her if she was getting a tax refund. She said yes, but it wasn’t enough. She was sickened with the idea of paying creditors all of her disposable income for years to come.

All of a sudden, she had an idea. She said, rather than trying to negotiate and pay down her credit card debt, using all of her disposable income, she said she could ask her uncle for the money. She said that she was thinking of asking him for a gift to help her pay down her loans anyway. Why not ask him for the same gift to pay her attorney’s fees?  Good idea! Sometimes asking relatives to help is a better option than worrying about how to pay overwhelming debt. I’ve had several clients in this kind of situation.

Once, a couple was in the same situation. The wife lost her job due to illness and then one thing led to another. They became deeply indebted, mostly to unsecured creditors (credit card companies). The best option for them was to file for bankruptcy. We talked a little bit and I gave them my best rate.  They were thankful, but without the extra cash, they didn’t know how to pay the legal fees. This was a problem for them.  However, determination overcomes lots of obstacles.

This couple scraped and saved and paid a little along. One spouse sold a baseball card collection and some tools.  The other sold some furniture they no longer needed. They used Craigslist and Facebook Yard Sale to sell a few more things.  They sent checks, one by one, to our office. Sometimes the check was small, sometimes large. We placed all of these funds into our client’s trust account, on hold for them until they finished paying. It didn’t take long. Within about four months, this couple paid all their fees, including the filing fee. This couple couldn’t have been happier.  I was so happy to help them in this way.

Once a person is determined to make a bad situation better, magic happens. There are more options for paying lawyer’s fees than these. Options are only limited by a person’s motivation, determination and imagination. Typically, I ask clients whether or not they have a tax refund coming to them.  This is a very good option for covering fees and things.  Then, I suggest asking friends or relatives for a gift.  At our office we have many ways of making your bankruptcy affordable, sometimes even free or at a reduced rate. Ask us how and perhaps we can help to make your fresh start,more affordable.  It may be easier than you think.

The Law Offices of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting clients in the Sturbridge, Southbridge, Dudley, Webster, Oxford, Charlton, Auburn, Spencer, Brookfield, Warren and all of the Worcester County Area. We can explore whether or not bankruptcy is the easy way out or not.  We have a comfortable place to talk and a free pot of coffee waiting for you.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit, http://www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

 

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Documents Needed Prior to the 341 Trustee Meeting (aka Meeting of the Creditors)

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Just the other day I was driving to my own client’s 341 Trustee meeting in Worcester, Massachusetts and I thought, most people have no clue what documents are needed prior to most trustee meetings.  So, here is the short list.

The documents you will need are generally the same whether you are filing a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy.  However, specific documentation requirements are something different in most every local jurisdiction.  Be sure to check your local rules or contact your attorney in your specific situation.  Your attorney can notify the trustee and find out what is needed.

Tax Returns

Minimally, and most importantly, your last year’s tax return is required to be delivered to the trustee minimally seven days prior to your 341 meeting.  Local rules and trustees vary on what is required prior to the meeting.  If you do not provide this to the trustee, prior to your meeting, your case could be dismissed.

Other than this, you will typically need to provide copies of your tax returns or tax transcripts for the last two years during your meeting.  I have found, over the years, that it is best if you sign your returns.  If you have tax returns that haven’t been filed, you will need to explain why you were not required to file.  If you did not have a valid reason for not filing, most trustees, especially in Chapter 13 cases, will require you to file your taxes and provide copies before concluding or approving your case.  Again, some trustees may require more tax returns while others may ask only for your most recent one.

Income

If you are an employee, you will need copies of pay stubs (also known as payment advances) for the six-month period prior to the bankruptcy.  You will also need your past two years W-2 forms.  If you collect Social Security or Social Security Disability Income, you will need your award letter.  If you are self-employed, you will probably need to provide a profit and loss statement for the same six-month period as well as business bank statements to verify the amounts on the statement. If you have income from other sources such as rental properties or unemployment, proof of this income is also required.

Real Estate

If you own real estate, a valuation of the property is required.  Generally, I recommend my client’s get a broker’s price opinion, or a full appraisal, but this depends upon the situation.  In some cases, this is not needed.  Mortgage statements showing current loan balances, deeds of trust, and proof of home insurance may also be required.

Vehicles

If you have titled vehicles, such as an automobile, you will be required to provide a recent copy of your vehicle registration.  I also recommend you have proof of insurance, and valuation information, such as a KBB (Kelly Blue Book) valuation (you can get this online). If you have a car loan, a recent loan statement showing how much you owe and what your monthly payment is, will be important.  For other titled property, such as boats or trucks, recent valuation may also be required.

Retirement Accounts and Other Bank Accounts

Recent bank account statements (checking and savings) and retirement account statements are usually very important to provide to the trustee.  Your attorney should have these.

Miscellaneous

If you have any other special circumstances, like child support or alimony, you will need to provide proof of these expenses.  Typically a copy of the judgment, order or agreement will be sufficient

Proof of Identification and Social Security Number   

This is very important.  When you go to your hearing with the trustee, you will be asked to show proof of identification.  So you must have these two things ready for the trustee at the beginning of your meeting.  Identification must be valid and include a recent photo.  Examples are a current state-issued ID card, a current driver’s license or valid passport.  You will also need to show proof of your social security number.  These documents are typically your state-issued social security card or employee-issued W-2 form.

That’s it. Now you are ready for your Meeting with the Trustee. If you have any questions or need any help, please give me a call. My direct line is 508-784-1014 (yes, this is the number that goes directly to me, personally).  I’ll be happy to set up your first free consultation, absolutely free.

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The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting new clients.  Call and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office offering your first confidential consultation, absolutely free of charge.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.com, visit us at Ginger B. Kelly on Facebook or feel free to call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2015, 2016, 2017, by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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