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Property Transferring No No’s, Before Filing Bankruptcy

Money in an envelope

Property Transferring No No’s, Before Filing Bankruptcy

by Attorney Ginger B. Kelly, February 23, 2018

There are a few types of transfers that will definitely not help if you want to file for bankruptcy to get a fresh start. One of those is types of transfers is called a prepetition transfer or (in other words) a fraudulent or irregular transfer.

Essentially, a prepetition transfer is a transfer of property (money or other things, including real estate) given to a person or creditor within 90 days from the date you file your petition. A prepetition transfer may also be a transfer of any property (money or other things, including real estate) to any insider, like a business partner, family or friend, within one year of your bankruptcy filing. Prepetition transfers are one of the biggest reasons why it is important to consult with a qualified, experienced, bankruptcy attorney, before you file. The prepetition transfer follows something called the 90 day rule.

Basically, the 90 day rule relates to debts that a debtor has paid, while insolvent, within the past 90 days of filing their bankruptcy petition and is set forth in section 547(b) of the Bankruptcy Code. The 90 day rule generally means that the US bankruptcy trustee has permission to avoid, (which means unwind or undo), any transfer made to a creditor or an insider if the transfer had an aggregate value of $600 or more provided that the transfer was made within 90 days from the date of the bankruptcy filing, and for any transfers made up to one year, if the person who received the transfer was an insider.

Here are a couple of examples of a fraudulent or irregular transfer:

Jane wanted to settle a debt before filing. She saved around $3,000 and was successful in negotiating with creditors to pay off one of her credit cards. Jane negotiated a settlement with blue credit company for $700 on October 30, 2017. She negotiated another settlement and paid red credit company $1,000 on November 1, 2017. After Jane negotiated successfully, with blue and red credit companies, she tried to negotiate with orange and green credit companies. She was unsuccessful. So Jane filed her bankruptcy without an attorney. Since she paid $700 to blue and $1,000 to red, her US Trustee avoided these transfers to get the money back. The trustee will allow all of Jane’s creditors to receive an equal share of the $1700 and prevent one particular creditor from benefiting more than the others. This is just one example. There are more.

The second section of the 90 day rule allows bankruptcy trustee to avoid any transfers of property made to any creditor that is also an insider (i.e., business partner, relative or friend) made between 90 days and one year of your bankruptcy filing date and exceeds and aggregate value of $600 or more.

In the next example, Steven bought his daughter Karen, a $15,000 car for graduating college. Steven paid $5,000 from funds he kept in his savings account and made the remainder of the purchase from a $10,000 line of credit on his credit card. On June 30, 2017, Steven transferred the title, over to his daughter.  In September of 2017, Steven lost his job. He was no longer able to make the remainder of Karen’s car payments. After four months without a job, Steven’s debt was piling up. So, in January 2018, Steven decided that he wanted to file chapter 7 bankruptcy to get a fresh financial start. If Steven were to file for bankruptcy before June 30, of 2018, there may be a good chance that the trustee would be able to avoid the car title transfer he made to his daughter, Karen. This would put the vehicle Steven just purchased for his daughter at risk. If Steven’s bankruptcy attorney knew of this transfer, the attorney would have warned Steven of the issues involving the purchase of Karen’s car prior to filing.

The fraudulent transfer rule involves all property, not just cash, and also applies to both chapters 7 and 13 bankruptcies. There are only a few exceptions. One, for example, is the exception for transfers made in the ordinary course of business, in other words, the property was sold to another (not an insider) for a fair and accurate value. But even so, bankruptcy can get complicated and for most folks, an attorney is usually needed to help out. Some people can’t imagine how to pay for a bankruptcy when they have no money. I’ll talk about that more, in my next article.

For now, if you’d like to set up an appointment to talk about affordability and your available options, call me. We can talk, face-to-face, and explore your options over a nice cup of coffee or tea.

The other day, a new client couple asked whether or not they should she use their tax return tax refund to pay down their credit card bills or use their tax refund to replace the roof on their home. Their roof needed repairing badly. Their credit card debt was very old. I cannot make that final decision for any of my clients, but I can advise them of their options. If you are in a position where you need to make important decisions like paying your credit card bills or paying for something extremely important, like a roof on your home, it may be a great idea to talk to a good attorney. Most give free first consultations.

If you are contemplating bankruptcy, and have some questions about a transfer you may have made or the 90 day rule, The Law Offices of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting clients in the Sturbridge, Southbridge, Dudley, Webster, Oxford, Charlton, Auburn, Spencer, Brookfield, Warren and all of the Worcester County Area. We can explore whether or not bankruptcy is the easy way out or not.  We have a comfortable place to talk and a free pot of coffee waiting for you.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit, http://www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Student Loan Debt and What to Do about it

Oh the places youd go if you weren't riddled with student loan debt

By, Attorney Ginger Kelly, November 9, 2017

According to US News, about half of all Massachusetts workers have some sort of bachelor’s degree.  That means high rates of student debt plague our state. But even worse, according to the Boston Globe, over 50% of college students in Boston drop out of college. That leaves even more people strapped by student loan debt without a degree.

When the national average for student loan debt almost reaches the $38,000 mark, it’s no wonder why student debt is becoming truly a national crisis. But where there’s a will, there’s a way. For some college grads, the best strategy is to be aggressive with paying back student loans.

For one college grad, Meghan from Boston, who paid  back her student debt within five years, it was all about prioritizing. “It’s possible if you want it badly enough,” she said. Meghan itemized her debt wish list and named her reasons for wanting to be debt free. Writing down your reasons helps to keep you on your journey. Being able to refer back to those reasons helps to overcome challenges and to remember why you’re making sacrifices.

Another college grad, Jason, felt overwhelmed while trying to pay the minimum on his $45,000 student loans.  So he took a different path and got serious about paying down his student debt. He reviewed every portion of his bank account, tightened spending, worked two jobs, and established a “done with debt” deadline. This helped Jason pay off his student loan debt in less than a year. Jason said that he kept spending very low and worked hard at his corporate job and also side job to pay off debt.

Aggressive payment plans are fine for some, but for those with small children and other priorities, aggressively paying off student loan debt is not always practical or attainable. Never the less, a few tips for grads may be helpful, while keeping in mind that every situation is quite different.

Start saving during the grace period: Use the grace period to review repayment options and figure out what is most affordable for your situation.

Choose a short repayment plan: Try to choose the shortest repayment plan you can afford, if you can do this without eating cat food and borrowing your sister’s car constantly. Although extended payment plans have lower monthly payments, the total interest will more than double for doubling the time.

Pay off expensive loans first, with one caveat: Some financial gurus believe that prioritizing paying off loans with the highest interest rate first is a good idea. But because not all situations are the same, this may not be the best strategy for getting out of debt quickly. Each situation is different. More on this to follow.

Trade your service for your debt: Certain programs, such as AmeriCorps, erase part or even all of a federal student loan. A year of service at AmeriCorps can pay for around $5,645 of your loan. Honestly, I know of no one who paid off their student loans by volunteering in AmeriCorps, but it’s an idea that’s out there.

Keep close contact with your lender: Be sure to tell your lender if you plan on moving or changing your phone number or email address. If they need to contact you but you are unavailable, this could add to your costs. Running the risk of missing payments or other important information is not an option.

Enroll in an ACH direct payment withdrawal option: Enrolling in ACH direct payment withdrawals will not only keep you from missing your payments, it allows for a .25% interest reduction rate for all federal loans and most private loans.

Those are the tips most financial gurus tell us.  However, most folks aren’t going to pay off their student debt by volunteering in AmeriCorps. But it’s an option. Most folks don’t work for in a low paying public service job, nor do they want to. Public service is only an option, not the only path.

Most people, graduates especially, have different types of debt and families with children. People in this category may choose to reduce or pay off their overall debt and just pay the minimum on lower-interest student loan debt until it makes sense to pay this off with a more aggressive student loan payment plan in the future.

*More about paying off expensive loans first: Although this makes perfectly good sense in some situations, the reality of life is that this is not always the best plan. Alternatively, it’s may be a better idea to lower your debt using a different strategy, like zero interest transfer options.

To start on the path to a zero interest transfer option, begin by paying down higher balance debt first and watch your credit scores climb. Then, find one or two zero interest transfer options to get rid of expensive debt and provide more time to pay off overall debt. For a little more in-depth discussion about balance transfer options read,  “When balance transfers make good sense” by Attorney Ginger Kelly.

But it’s not always all about paying down student loans; becoming debt free and more comfortable in your own financial shoes is really about analyzing the total debt you have and working a strategy that makes good sense from a credit bureau point of view.

Total debt to income is what really hurts a person’s ability to feel more confident, secure and to enjoy life a little better. If you want to make a change for the better, maybe get out of your parent’s basement quicker, work on your student loans after trying these strategies. Notice, I did not say simple strategies. They aren’t simple and take time. So be patient. Patience is a virtue, so they say.

1. Lower your total debt to credit ratio: Prioritize personal and consumer loans (like credit cards) to lower your total percent of used to unused credit and really make your credit scores soar. Doing this will lower your total debt to available credit ratio. Having higher percentages of unused credit for all your debt will lower your debt threshold and increase your credit scores. Higher credit scores are what you need to get lower high interest rates or no interest credit card introductory rates with low fee balance transfer options. This plan is not instantaneous (like most good things), but over a year or less many college grads, and people in general, can increase their credit scores 50 to 100 points or more. But wait. Besting your best credit scores isn’t all there is to it.

2. Don’t close old credit card accounts. Then, never ever close old credit card accounts. Keep them, at least for a long while until your 100% confident it makes no sense to have better credit scores. Closing old accounts will damage your credit scores. Damaging credit scores while paying off debt can take you back to square one. Keep old credit cards and move on to the next step.

3. Find zero or low interest balance transfer cards, and use them. With a credit score of 700 or better, don’t run out and finance a new car but rather, find the best lower interest or no interest balance transfer cards by looking, very hard, online. Do the research and find the best deals and then transfer balances from higher interest credit cards to lower or zero balance cards.

Many times, frugal websites like Andy Prescot’s “The Art of Being Cheep”
help with the initial research. Nerdwallet.com and MagnifyMoney.com are also helpful websites. Magnify Money has a great chart on the best balance transfer credit cards and an idea of what kind of credit scores you need to get them.

4. Use the zero balance time to aggressively pay down all revolving debt. With a zero or low interest credit card introductory rate, take this time to aggressively pay down all your credit cards. This will help your credit to grow.

5. Now it’s time to say good bye to student loans. At this point, with better than average credit scores, you have placed yourself in the best position possible to become more pro-active regarding paying down student loan debt. Student debt tends to be the lowest interest debt most people have. So why not make the most of the bargain and aggressively pay down this type of debt last and not first. Manage your debt before you debt manages you.

If there is no way to pay down your debt or debt is managing you, or even killing you, talk to a good consumer debt lawyer or bankruptcy lawyer immediately. Sometimes, they can advise you on which debt to pay first or not and whether or not bankruptcy is an option to explore. Most offer free first consultations.

My advice to people is to find at least three lawyers who offer free first consultations. Visit all three and compare. Pick the lawyer that makes the best sense to you, one that you can talk to, and then stick with that lawyer. Not all lawyers are perfect, remember this. But finding a good adviser who can help you manage your finances and deal with overwhelming consumer and student loan debt is like finding gold when you least expect it.
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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit, http://www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.
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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We can not stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2017 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Documents Needed Prior to the 341 Trustee Meeting (aka Meeting of the Creditors)

documents-required

Just the other day I was driving to my own client’s 341 Trustee meeting in Worcester, Massachusetts and I thought, most people have no clue what documents are needed prior to most trustee meetings.  So, here is the short list.

The documents you will need are generally the same whether you are filing a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy.  However, specific documentation requirements are something different in most every local jurisdiction.  Be sure to check your local rules or contact your attorney in your specific situation.  Your attorney can notify the trustee and find out what is needed.

Tax Returns

Minimally, and most importantly, your last year’s tax return is required to be delivered to the trustee minimally seven days prior to your 341 meeting.  Local rules and trustees vary on what is required prior to the meeting.  If you do not provide this to the trustee, prior to your meeting, your case could be dismissed.

Other than this, you will typically need to provide copies of your tax returns or tax transcripts for the last two years during your meeting.  I have found, over the years, that it is best if you sign your returns.  If you have tax returns that haven’t been filed, you will need to explain why you were not required to file.  If you did not have a valid reason for not filing, most trustees, especially in Chapter 13 cases, will require you to file your taxes and provide copies before concluding or approving your case.  Again, some trustees may require more tax returns while others may ask only for your most recent one.

Income

If you are an employee, you will need copies of pay stubs (also known as payment advances) for the six-month period prior to the bankruptcy.  You will also need your past two years W-2 forms.  If you collect Social Security or Social Security Disability Income, you will need your award letter.  If you are self-employed, you will probably need to provide a profit and loss statement for the same six-month period as well as business bank statements to verify the amounts on the statement. If you have income from other sources such as rental properties or unemployment, proof of this income is also required.

Real Estate

If you own real estate, a valuation of the property is required.  Generally, I recommend my client’s get a broker’s price opinion, or a full appraisal, but this depends upon the situation.  In some cases, this is not needed.  Mortgage statements showing current loan balances, deeds of trust, and proof of home insurance may also be required.

Vehicles

If you have titled vehicles, such as an automobile, you will be required to provide a recent copy of your vehicle registration.  I also recommend you have proof of insurance, and valuation information, such as a KBB (Kelly Blue Book) valuation (you can get this online). If you have a car loan, a recent loan statement showing how much you owe and what your monthly payment is, will be important.  For other titled property, such as boats or trucks, recent valuation may also be required.

Retirement Accounts and Other Bank Accounts

Recent bank account statements (checking and savings) and retirement account statements are usually very important to provide to the trustee.  Your attorney should have these.

Miscellaneous

If you have any other special circumstances, like child support or alimony, you will need to provide proof of these expenses.  Typically a copy of the judgment, order or agreement will be sufficient

Proof of Identification and Social Security Number   

This is very important.  When you go to your hearing with the trustee, you will be asked to show proof of identification.  So you must have these two things ready for the trustee at the beginning of your meeting.  Identification must be valid and include a recent photo.  Examples are a current state-issued ID card, a current driver’s license or valid passport.  You will also need to show proof of your social security number.  These documents are typically your state-issued social security card or employee-issued W-2 form.

That’s it. Now you are ready for your Meeting with the Trustee. If you have any questions or need any help, please give me a call. My direct line is 508-784-1014 (yes, this is the number that goes directly to me, personally).  I’ll be happy to set up your first free consultation, absolutely free.

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The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting new clients.  Call and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office offering your first confidential consultation, absolutely free of charge.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.com, visit us at Ginger B. Kelly on Facebook or feel free to call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2015, 2016, 2017, by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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4 Qualities That Make My Lawyer Great

 I don't always need a lawyer but when I do I make sure my lawyer is great

Most of us will need a lawyer, at least once in our lives. The lawyer we hire will be our confident. Our lawyer will keep our secrets. Our lawyer will know about our finances. Our lawyer will hear our complaints. They may see us cry. They will negotiate with our adversaries and listen to our desires and hopes.

Sometimes, our lawyer will be the bearer of bad news. They help us cope. They help us deal. They help us celebrate. Our lawyer will know who we are, where we live, and what we want out of life.  Hopefully, our lawyer will understand us. No…..I don’t mean just hear what we say, I mean really understand us on a deeper level.

Surprisingly, not many people do much research before hiring a lawyer.  Doing a quick Google-search or talking to your mother’s best friend’s cousin seems good enough for a lot of folks.  This lack of due diligence works out really nicely for lawyers with issues, like substance abuse, mental illnesses and poor work ethic, but it’s horrible for you.

Chances are that you and your lawyer will be in it for the long haul.  You will spend more time with your attorney then you ever dreamed possible.  So what do you really need to know about someone who you will trust with some of the most important matters of your life?  Here are a few tips.

  1.  Like a great friend, a great lawyer will be there when you need them the most.  

Have you ever had a good friend who didn’t return your phone calls or respond to your emails or text messages?  Lawyers are often like this too. Great lawyers return calls and communicate the status of your case, not sparingly, but all the time.  They send updates and talk about the future, the things that matter most.  So why don’t lawyers return calls?

Lawyers, like many people, have reasons and make excuses for not communicating. They may suffer from alcoholism or depression. Statistics indicate that lawyers suffer from alcoholism and depression at rates significantly higher than the general population. In fact, lawyers have the most alcoholics of any profession. Being too busy is another excuse for lack of communication. Then there is avoidance.

Why would a lawyer ever avoid telling a client the truth?  Exactly – when there’s bad news. Did they lose the case?  Did they miss a deadline? Are they overwhelmed? When the fantastic lawyer you hired is so swamped with work that they fail to call, they fall very short of being effective. Not only is this not professional, it’s not as uncommon as you think.

Great lawyers, who are genuinely concerned about you, don’t avoid calls.  Just like friends, outstanding lawyers stay close. Great lawyers, like great friends, do all that they can to be there and watch your back, especially when you need them.

  1.  A lawyer should always be honest and transparent, but a great lawyer knows how and when to be honest.  

Chances are, you will share some of the most exciting things in your life with your lawyer. There are lots of reasons why your lawyer will be the first one who hears your good news, along with the bad.  A good lawyer knows how to be honest and clear, without crushing your enthusiasm.  Not deflating joy, while dealing with reality, is an art. The fine art of listening, while uplifting others, is a topic touches me personally.

One day, a few years back, my adult daughter told me that she was going on a business trip to Cairo, Egypt.  At that time, Egypt was full of conflict and danger.  In Cairo, it was not unusual to see men walking casually down main streets with heavy artillery.  People wore AK-47’s like jewelry.  Needless to say, when my daughter told me she was going to Cairo, Egypt, I was not happy.

I expressed to my daughter, with no reservation, my deepest darkest fears.  “Egypt was a very dangerous place”, I said.  “I’m really afraid for your safety,” I said.

Unfortunately, I didn’t listen to my daughter carefully enough and wore my emotions on my sleeve. As you may have guessed, my daughter was not very happy. Her joy was crushed. Stonewalling me in no uncertain terms, she said, “Mom, I don’t want to talk about it!”  I was hurt.  It was quite some time before we talked to each other.

A few weeks later, we had another conversation. This time things were very different.  I asked her to explain to me why she was so mad.

She said, “Mom, I expected you to act differently.”  She explained to me that she was so excited about her wonderful overseas adventure, that she wanted me to share in her joy not deflate her spirits.  She explained to me that my lack of confidence in her, to make wise decisions, was upsetting.  Right then and there, I realized I needed to think about what was said and how I responded to my daughter.

To make a long story short, my daughter and I both apologized to each other and we both had a good talk about what had happened.  Now, I try to do my best to listen very carefully to others.  I try to think twice and talk once.  I work on keeping my emotions intact and understanding the situation, before I express my concerns.  My daughter also learned that it’s not always a good idea to expect people to act the way you want them to act.

Actually, I think we both learned how to listen and discuss things better with one another.  This is the point.  Almost all great relationship building begins with a learning curve of understanding.  This was one of those learning curve moments, for the both of us.  We both grew and became better, as a result of our misunderstanding.

Find an attorney who continues to improve upon their listening and communication skills.   Great lawyers aren’t always perfect, but they are honest and they try harder than most to communicate and listen to their clients when they are needed.

  1.  A lawyer should always be respectful and decent, but a great lawyer will respect your space and value your emotional energy.

Some clients struggle with the fact that a lot of lawyers take up too much of their emotional energy. Believe it or not, like friends, some lawyers can suck you down a vortex of critically bad emotional thoughts.

Some lawyers are jealous of other lawyers.  Some lawyers have a lot of negativity in their lives.  Some attorneys want to dominate your time with things or small talk.  They are unclear about appointments and fail to work hard on your case to the point that you feel they aren’t doing even simple investigations and research. All of these types of things can leave you feeling deflated and unsure of what to do next.

Then there are the lawyers who constantly bad mouth other lawyers.  This is not good. This could be a good indicator that your lawyer has a few insecurity or mental issues.  Be wary of this sort of thing.  It really doesn’t matter why, but when a lawyer never has enough time to discuss your case with you, don’t attach yourself to them.  Attaching your legal matter, and yourself, to a lawyer who is a mental, emotional and financial suck is like attaching yourself to a leach. Find a different lawyer, quickly.

An outstanding lawyer will respect your space and time.  They will be cognizant about your need to do other things, like pick up your kids from daycare, go to an important dinner-date with your partner or spouse or not be late for work.  It’s never a good idea to bind yourself to a lawyer who dominates your time and takes all your energy.  A good lawyer will respect your boundaries and give you good clear time-frames when something needs to be done and how it should happen.  A good lawyer does not expect you to do their work or read their mind.  This is also true of good friends.

  1.  A good lawyer communicates well, a great lawyer listens and will know how (and when) to take an attorney-client conversation to a deeper level.

Great, lawyers tend to be appropriately upbeat and care enough to discuss important things.  They enjoy listening to stories related to your case that seem meaningful and important to you.  Good lawyers give you freedom to talk, gather your thoughts, or simply take a moment or two of silence.

A good friend will give you an ear to listen or a helping hand when you really need one.  They don’t cut you off or incessantly talk about themselves.  True friendships have a reciprocity of give and take and know when and how to respect your space.  The same is true for lawyers.  A great lawyer will value the relationship enough to know when it is important and appropriate, to take a conversation to a deeper, more meaningful level. Sometimes this is important. Other times, it’s a necessity.

Of course not every situation is the same.  Not every conversation with your lawyer will become deep and meaningful. Lawyers are our trusted advocates. When the circumstances justify the need, like a good friend, an outstanding lawyer will be there to listen.

It is also important to know that we lawyers are a rare breed.  We share our lives with people who are uniquely positioned to see us at our best and at our worst, as lawyers and individuals.  This is another good reason why taking the time to get to know your lawyer is important.  If you’ve seen your lawyer at their worst, and you still trust them, you’ve probably found a great lawyer.

When I was young and I used to go to the grocery store with my mother.  When we were in the produce aisle I’d watch her by fruit.  She would select melons, for example, by looking at them carefully.  When she found a melon she was interested in, she would pick it up in her hands and hold it for a moment or two.  She would look the melon from top to bottom.  She would touch it, thump it, smell it and press down on its skin.  My mother would do all of this before selecting one simple melon.  Think about it.

Here, we are dealing with people. It may seem very difficult to deeply connect and create an important and lasting relationship with your lawyer, but it’s not. Connecting with your lawyer is no different than connecting with some of your closest friends. So why not apply these four basic principles of finding lasting relationships, to find a truly great lawyer?

“Great lawyers are like good friends, hard to find, harder to leave and impossible to forget.”  ~Attorney Kelly

by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., June 17, 2015

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.squarespace.com or www.attorneykelly.wordpress.com, or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We can not stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2015 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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