Tag Archives: Chapter 13

With No Money, How Do I Pay My Attorney to File My Bankruptcy?

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How do I Pay My Attorney for My Bankruptcy?

By, Ginger Kelly, Esq.  April 10, 2018

The other day, a personal friend asked me (for a friend), whether or not they should she use their tax return tax refund to pay down their credit card bills or to replace the old and leaking roof on their home.  Their roof needed repairing badly.  Their credit card debt was very old and the payments were more than they could afford.  Even though I can’t make that final decision for this friend’s friend (or any of my clients), I can advise most folks of their legal options.  When people need to make a choice between a roof over their head or paying credit card bills, one good option available to most everyone is a fresh start.

In many or most situations, bankruptcy can give an individual or a couple, the fresh start they need. If you are in a position where you need to make important decisions like what to pay and what not to pay, like a roof on your home or to repair the vehicle you need to get to work, talk to a good bankruptcy attorney.  Most give free first consultations, like our office. Bankruptcy might be an option for you, or maybe not.  A person hasn’t lost but an hour of their time discussing their options with a good attorney.  Talking to a professional about options for taking care of debt, sometimes gives the clarity you need to make the right decisions for your future.

A client visited me the other day to discuss her situation. Apparently, she had debt exceeding any amount she could pay.  It wasn’t much debt, but it was a lot for her and that is important. Her earnings were barely more than the poverty level.  So while we had a nice hot cup of coffee, we talked about all of her options.  It was a nice pleasant, casual conversation.  I discovered that my client earned too much money to qualify for a free bankruptcy, through legal aid. She was sad and asked me what can be done.

Because her bankruptcy was not complex, I agreed to lower my fee. I gave her my best  fee option. Still, she was worried. Where would she find the money to pay the attorney fee? I asked her if she was getting a tax refund. She said yes, but it wasn’t enough. She was sickened with the idea of paying creditors all of her disposable income for years to come.

All of a sudden, she had an idea. She said, rather than trying to negotiate and pay down her credit card debt, using all of her disposable income, she said she could ask her uncle for the money. She said that she was thinking of asking him for a gift to help her pay down her loans anyway. Why not ask him for the same gift to pay her attorney’s fees?  Good idea! Sometimes asking relatives to help is a better option than worrying about how to pay overwhelming debt. I’ve had several clients in this kind of situation.

Once, a couple was in the same situation. The wife lost her job due to illness and then one thing led to another. They became deeply indebted, mostly to unsecured creditors (credit card companies). The best option for them was to file for bankruptcy. We talked a little bit and I gave them my best rate.  They were thankful, but without the extra cash, they didn’t know how to pay the legal fees. This was a problem for them.  However, determination overcomes lots of obstacles.

This couple scraped and saved and paid a little along. One spouse sold a baseball card collection and some tools.  The other sold some furniture they no longer needed. They used Craigslist and Facebook Yard Sale to sell a few more things.  They sent checks, one by one, to our office. Sometimes the check was small, sometimes large. We placed all of these funds into our client’s trust account, on hold for them until they finished paying. It didn’t take long. Within about four months, this couple paid all their fees, including the filing fee. This couple couldn’t have been happier.  I was so happy to help them in this way.

Once a person is determined to make a bad situation better, magic happens. There are more options for paying lawyer’s fees than these. Options are only limited by a person’s motivation, determination and imagination. Typically, I ask clients whether or not they have a tax refund coming to them.  This is a very good option for covering fees and things.  Then, I suggest asking friends or relatives for a gift.  At our office we have many ways of making your bankruptcy affordable, sometimes even free or at a reduced rate. Ask us how and perhaps we can help to make your fresh start,more affordable.  It may be easier than you think.

The Law Offices of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting clients in the Sturbridge, Southbridge, Dudley, Webster, Oxford, Charlton, Auburn, Spencer, Brookfield, Warren and all of the Worcester County Area. We can explore whether or not bankruptcy is the easy way out or not.  We have a comfortable place to talk and a free pot of coffee waiting for you.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit, http://www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

 

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Property Transferring No No’s, Before Filing Bankruptcy

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Property Transferring No No’s, Before Filing Bankruptcy

by Attorney Ginger B. Kelly, February 23, 2018

There are a few types of transfers that will definitely not help if you want to file for bankruptcy to get a fresh start. One of those is types of transfers is called a prepetition transfer or (in other words) a fraudulent or irregular transfer.

Essentially, a prepetition transfer is a transfer of property (money or other things, including real estate) given to a person or creditor within 90 days from the date you file your petition. A prepetition transfer may also be a transfer of any property (money or other things, including real estate) to any insider, like a business partner, family or friend, within one year of your bankruptcy filing. Prepetition transfers are one of the biggest reasons why it is important to consult with a qualified, experienced, bankruptcy attorney, before you file. The prepetition transfer follows something called the 90 day rule.

Basically, the 90 day rule relates to debts that a debtor has paid, while insolvent, within the past 90 days of filing their bankruptcy petition and is set forth in section 547(b) of the Bankruptcy Code. The 90 day rule generally means that the US bankruptcy trustee has permission to avoid, (which means unwind or undo), any transfer made to a creditor or an insider if the transfer had an aggregate value of $600 or more provided that the transfer was made within 90 days from the date of the bankruptcy filing, and for any transfers made up to one year, if the person who received the transfer was an insider.

Here are a couple of examples of a fraudulent or irregular transfer:

Jane wanted to settle a debt before filing. She saved around $3,000 and was successful in negotiating with creditors to pay off one of her credit cards. Jane negotiated a settlement with blue credit company for $700 on October 30, 2017. She negotiated another settlement and paid red credit company $1,000 on November 1, 2017. After Jane negotiated successfully, with blue and red credit companies, she tried to negotiate with orange and green credit companies. She was unsuccessful. So Jane filed her bankruptcy without an attorney. Since she paid $700 to blue and $1,000 to red, her US Trustee avoided these transfers to get the money back. The trustee will allow all of Jane’s creditors to receive an equal share of the $1700 and prevent one particular creditor from benefiting more than the others. This is just one example. There are more.

The second section of the 90 day rule allows bankruptcy trustee to avoid any transfers of property made to any creditor that is also an insider (i.e., business partner, relative or friend) made between 90 days and one year of your bankruptcy filing date and exceeds and aggregate value of $600 or more.

In the next example, Steven bought his daughter Karen, a $15,000 car for graduating college. Steven paid $5,000 from funds he kept in his savings account and made the remainder of the purchase from a $10,000 line of credit on his credit card. On June 30, 2017, Steven transferred the title, over to his daughter.  In September of 2017, Steven lost his job. He was no longer able to make the remainder of Karen’s car payments. After four months without a job, Steven’s debt was piling up. So, in January 2018, Steven decided that he wanted to file chapter 7 bankruptcy to get a fresh financial start. If Steven were to file for bankruptcy before June 30, of 2018, there may be a good chance that the trustee would be able to avoid the car title transfer he made to his daughter, Karen. This would put the vehicle Steven just purchased for his daughter at risk. If Steven’s bankruptcy attorney knew of this transfer, the attorney would have warned Steven of the issues involving the purchase of Karen’s car prior to filing.

The fraudulent transfer rule involves all property, not just cash, and also applies to both chapters 7 and 13 bankruptcies. There are only a few exceptions. One, for example, is the exception for transfers made in the ordinary course of business, in other words, the property was sold to another (not an insider) for a fair and accurate value. But even so, bankruptcy can get complicated and for most folks, an attorney is usually needed to help out. Some people can’t imagine how to pay for a bankruptcy when they have no money. I’ll talk about that more, in my next article.

For now, if you’d like to set up an appointment to talk about affordability and your available options, call me. We can talk, face-to-face, and explore your options over a nice cup of coffee or tea.

The other day, a new client couple asked whether or not they should she use their tax return tax refund to pay down their credit card bills or use their tax refund to replace the roof on their home. Their roof needed repairing badly. Their credit card debt was very old. I cannot make that final decision for any of my clients, but I can advise them of their options. If you are in a position where you need to make important decisions like paying your credit card bills or paying for something extremely important, like a roof on your home, it may be a great idea to talk to a good attorney. Most give free first consultations.

If you are contemplating bankruptcy, and have some questions about a transfer you may have made or the 90 day rule, The Law Offices of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting clients in the Sturbridge, Southbridge, Dudley, Webster, Oxford, Charlton, Auburn, Spencer, Brookfield, Warren and all of the Worcester County Area. We can explore whether or not bankruptcy is the easy way out or not.  We have a comfortable place to talk and a free pot of coffee waiting for you.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit, http://www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Bankruptcy, the Easy Way Out. Really?

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By Ginger B. Kelly, Esq. Posted: May 16, 2017

In 2013 there were over a million bankruptcy filings.  In 2014, there were slightly less than a million.  Based on these filing numbers, something like 1 out of every 200 adults in the US file for bankruptcy (uscourts.gov). That’s a lot of people turning to bankruptcy.  Based on these figures, it appears as if bankruptcy seems like an easy way out, or is it?  Let’s consider a few things before making this assumption, like the implications of a filing and how bankruptcy compares to other debt relief options.

Is Bankruptcy Really the Easy Way Out?

Basically, a typical Chapter 7 bankruptcy (total liquidation) filing involves three basic steps.

#1.  Paperwork: To begin any bankruptcy case, a series of forms outlining your debts, assets, income, expenses, and related information need to be filed.  This is not like your ordinary tax return.  There are multiple papers that need to be filed. It’s a ton of paperwork.

#2. Trustee Meeting: After the petition, the schedules and all the paperwork has been filed, a court hearing date for a 341 Trustee Meeting will be scheduled.  The Trustee Meeting (also known as the Meeting of the Creditors), the bankruptcy trustee will ask you many questions.  In Massachusetts, you will be given notice that the meeting is recorded.  Most of the questions confirm the information in your paperwork.  The Trustee may ask you about how your debts and assets will be handled. For most Chapter 7 filers, the Trustee Meeting goes rather quickly, about 15 minutes or so.

#3.  Discharge – After the Trustee Meeting, assuming nothing goes wrong, there are no issues or complications, most of your debts will be discharged.  A few debts that will not be discharged are Student Loans, some IRS Tax Debt and a few other things.  Now the person filing Chapter 7 can begin their fresh start.

But wait…

Those three steps are an over-simplification of the process.  There is a lot more to it.  Many other important legal considerations must be dealt with, in a typical Chapter 7 bankruptcy case. This is why most people consult with a lawyer before beginning or considering any Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy case.

Even when the case is closed, there’s a lot to consider.  Credit card debts, medical debts, payday loans and most other unsecured debts, are gone, but other debts like student loans may not ever go away.  Secured debts, like car loans and home mortgages can also go away.  But if a person whats to keep their home or car or both, they will need to reaffirm those debts and continue making those payments.  Sometimes, a reaffirmation hearing is required.

So why is Bankruptcy complicated?

Primarily, there are two big potential problems, maybe more.

#1.  Valuable property at Risk.  Because a bankruptcy trustee will evaluate both debts and assets, to determine if some debt could be repaid by liquidating (selling) your assets, a filer runs the risk of losing some important assets.

For most people, the two primary things they don’t want to lose are automobiles and real estate.  These two assets are the easiest to sell.  If the value of a filer’s home or car (or both) is much greater than the loan you used to buy it, that property could potentially be sold to repay creditors.

For more on how this works, and on the exemption laws that protect your property in bankruptcy, see this article, Should I Choose Massachusetts or Federal Bankruptcy Exemptions.

#2.  Effect on credit scores. The other issues most people worry about when it comes to filing for bankruptcy is how this affects credit scores.  Everyone knows any bankruptcy will have a serious impact on a FICO score for several years.  The degree of impact depends upon how good or bad a filer’s credit is the day they file their petition.  The better the credit the more significant the drop will be.  If a filer’s credit was shot to begin with, or on the low side, (which is true for most people who file for bankruptcy), the effect will be significant, but less than a filer with good credit.

To sum it all up, when a person files for bankruptcy, they can expect that obtaining loans right away won’t be so easy.  Often, credit cards and even car loans are available, but typically at very high rates of interest.  However, when a filer sticks to a reasonable budget, and pays their bills on time, they will be off to a fresh start and better credit over time.

Alternatives to Bankruptcy.

It’s been said that bankruptcy is sort of the “ultimate weapon” of debt relief.  But this means that bankruptcy should only be used when other options fail.  A discharge of debt via bankruptcy is only available once every seven or more years; bankruptcy is not something a person should try first.  Some people work with credit management companies to reduce debt, but I do not recommend this in most cases.  Others try asking family for help or they find another source of income, like a second job.  Adjusting one’s budget is always a good plan.  Do this before considering filing for bankruptcy.

Next Steps…

For those who have tried every option and have no realistic alternatives, then it’s time to schedule a consultation with a bankruptcy lawyer. Your first consultation should not cost a dime and it’s a good time to find out if bankruptcy will work in your situation.  When you meet with your lawyer, be sure to ask a few important questions.

  • Based on my income and job situation, do I qualify for bankruptcy?
  • Can I get rid of all my debts in bankruptcy?
  • Is property I own (bring a list of a few big items) unprotected or at risk?

A quick consultation with a good lawyer will help you understand a few things bankruptcy can do to help and what the risks would likely be or whether or not there are better options.

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The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting new clients.  Call and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office offering your first confidential consultation, absolutely free of charge.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.com, visit us at Ginger B. Kelly on Facebook or feel free to call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2017, by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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The Domino Effect: Filing a First and Second Bankruptcy

domino-effect

By:  Ginger B. Kelly, Esq.

If anyone has played dominoes, they realize that one small mistake can cause an entire stack of dominoes to come crashing down.  The same is true for filing first and subsequent bankruptcies.  If a person has received a discharge or has filed for bankruptcy in the past, it’s important to know how soon they can file for bankruptcy again.  Time limitations for discharge under bankruptcy, after filing a prior bankruptcy in a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy, may be tricky and are different under different circumstances and chapters.  This overview is intended to help potential filers make wise choices before the stack of dominoes collapses.

Technically, Time Limits Do Not Apply to Filings

In theory, there is no minimum time to wait before you can file for bankruptcy the second time around.  However, the dilemma with filing a second time is if a person files too soon after they received a discharge of their debts in a prior case, they can’t get another discharge. Filing too soon makes the second bankruptcy filing a waste of time and money.  This is why time frames apply to receiving a second discharge, not the filing of the case.

Filing Again Under the Same Chapter

If a person is filing under the same bankruptcy chapter, the time frames are different depending on whether they file successive Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 cases.

Filing Again Under Chapter 7

If the first discharge was under Chapter 7, a second discharge is not permitted under Chapter 7 again, until eight years from the date the first case was filed.

Filing Again Under Chapter 13

If the first discharge was under Chapter 13, a second discharge is not permitted under Chapter 13 again, until two years from the date the first case was filed.

The only issue with consecutive Chapter 13 bankruptcy cases filed too closely together is if the court refuses to confirm your Chapter 13 plan in the second case. Ordinarily, if the second plan is not confirmed a person can convert the bankruptcy to a Chapter 7.  However, in this set of circumstances, the rules for receiving a discharge under Chapter 7, after a discharge under Chapter 13 will prevent a person from getting a discharge in the converted case.  This is why converting a case from a Chapter 13 to a Chapter 7 too soon, isn’t a good idea in most situations.

Different Chapter Filings: Order Matters

If the second bankruptcy filing is under a different chapter then the first, order determines the time frame.

First, Chapter 13: Second, Chapter 7

If a person received their first discharge under Chapter 13, they cannot receive a discharge under any Chapter 7 case that is filed within six years from the date they filed the first Chapter 13.  Generally, the six-year waiting period exceptions are:

  •  if all the unsecured creditors were paid in full under the Chapter 13, or
  •  at least seventy percent of Chapter 13 claims were paid, the plan was proposed in good faith and the payments were the best effort possible.

First, Chapter 7:  Second, Chapter 13

If a person received a discharge under Chapter 7 first, they cannot receive a discharge under Chapter 13 filed within four years from the date the initial Chapter 7 was filed.

It’s a bit tricky if a person files the second case under Chapter 13, between four and eight years after they filed the first Chapter 7 when the court doesn’t approve the Chapter 13 plan.  If the Chapter 13 plan was not approved, “technically” a person could convert the case to a Chapter 7, but this isn’t a good idea because the rules for successive Chapter 7 discharges would kick in.  In this situation, if the time frame between subsequent filings is not eight years, a person will not receive a discharge in the converted case. If this happens, it is probably best to ask for a dismissal of the subsequent Chapter 13 case.

When a Second Filing May be Helpful, Even Without a Discharge

In certain situations, filing a Chapter 13 case immediately after getting a Chapter 7 discharge might be beneficial.  This is often referred to as a Chapter 20 bankruptcy.

In this situation, for example, a person wants the protection of the bankruptcy court while paying something like a tax debt or non-dischargeable priority debts, under a Chapter 13 plan. Whether or not they will benefit from this type of Chapter 20 bankruptcy depends on the circumstances and the case law in their jurisdiction.  But despite its benefits, a Chapter 20 has many drawbacks and can be subject to bad faith filing objections.  An experienced bankruptcy lawyer in your area would need to be consulted for advice on this topic.

First Case Not Discharged

If the first bankruptcy case did not result in a discharge, typically, a person can file for bankruptcy again with no limitations on the second discharge.

Discharge vs. Dismissal

First, it may be important to note that there is a big difference between a discharge and a dismissal.  A discharge is an order from the bankruptcy court releasing a person from their debts.  A dismissal from a bankruptcy court is an order removing the case from the docket, typically without a discharge.  

If a person successfully completes a case and obtains a discharge, they are no longer on the hook for debts discharged in the bankruptcy. However, if a case gets dismissed, the person who filed will lose the protection of the automatic stay and their creditors are free to come after them to collect their debts.

First Case Dismissal

If a bankruptcy case was dismissed, a person can file again unless the court orders otherwise.  If the case was dismissed for failure to obey a court order, failure to appear in the case, or voluntarily dismissed after a creditor filed a motion for relief from the bankruptcy stay, a 180-day waiting rule applies.  However, quite often there are different rules regarding the bankruptcy stay.  A stay is an automatic injunction that stops actions by creditors, with certain exceptions, to collect debts from a debtor who has declared bankruptcy.

First Case Discharge Denied

If the discharge was denied in the first case, a person typically may file again but will probably not be entitled to a discharge of the debts from the first case. This is another special circumstance where it is always smart to seek an experienced bankruptcy lawyer for advice.

The take-away from all of this is, as a general rule, if a person files for bankruptcy too soon after they received a previous bankruptcy discharge, they cannot receive another discharge.  Like a neat little stack of dominoes, the second case is very dependent upon the first.  The good news is, avoiding mistakes can be easy.  Consulting an experienced attorney is the first step.

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The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting new clients.  Call and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office offering your first confidential consultation, absolutely free of charge.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.com, or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2015, 2016, 2017, by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

 

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