Category Archives: Massachusetts law

Tricky Short Sale Deficiency Judgments

Short Sale KeysTricky Short Sale Deficiency Judgments

By Attorney Ginger Kelly

Agreeing to a short sale may seem like the best way to avoid foreclosure in many situations, but what happens to the money owed, after the short sale?

Quite often homeowners think short sales are the perfect solution to a difficult situation, the silver bullet, so to speak. The bank agrees to accept a sale price for less than the mortgage amount and presto, foreclosure averted!  But the problem with this is, a year or so after a short sale is completed, the mortgage lender can (and often will) seek a deficiency judgment against the former homeowner.

What is a Short Sale?

A short sale is when you sell your home for less than the total debt balance remaining on the mortgage. The sale price is “short” of the full debt amount. The short sale process involves the mortgage lender agreeing to accept the sale proceeds and release the lien on the property and then, the proceeds of the sale pay off a portion of the mortgage balance. Short sales are one way for borrowers to avoid foreclosure.

What is a Deficiency Judgment?

A deficiency is when a foreclosure sale doesn’t produce enough funds to pay the mortgage debt in full. The amount of the deficiency is the difference between the amount of the mortgage debt and the foreclosure sale price. A deficiency judgment is a judgment that the lender may obtain from a Judge, giving the lender the right to collect the deficiency from the borrower.

In a short sale situation, for example, if a homeowner sells their home in a short sale for $200,000, and the amount owed on the mortgage was $250,000, then $50,000 would be the deficiency amount. The lender could get a judgment from a Court Judge for the amount left owing and then some. This includes not only the $50,000 deficiency, but interest, other costs and sometimes attorney’s fees.

Deficiency Judgments in Massachusetts and Why are They So “Tricky?” 

Massachusetts is one of those states where a lender is permitted to seek a personal judgment against a borrower after a short sale to recover the deficiency amount. The tricky part comes in when, in general, once the lender gets a deficiency judgment against a borrower, the lender may collect this amount by using things such as a wage garnishment, bank account levy or by placing liens on titled property, like automobiles and motorcycles.

In Massachusetts, after a short sale, the lender can choose to do one of the following two things about the deficiency:

  1. The lender may choose to forgive the deficiency amount and issue to the borrower a Form 1099-C (Cancellation of Debt), which reports the deficiency as taxable income to the IRS. If this happens, the borrower (former homeowner) will have to pay taxes on the additional income this brings in the year they receive the 1099-C.  For most people, who were struggling to pay their mortgage, this causes tremendous hardship.
  2. The lender may choose not to forgive that part of the debt that has not been covered by the sales price and keep the right to file a court action to obtain a deficiency judgment.

If you are a homeowner and are thinking about negotiating a short sale with your mortgage lender in Massachusetts, it is very important to negotiate with your lender before you agree to a sale, to have the deficiency forgiven.

How Can I Avoid a Deficiency Judgment Following a Short Sale?

There are at least four ways to avoid having to pay back the deficiency.

  1. Negotiate a Waiver of the Lender’s Right to Seek a Deficiency Judgment

When a homeowner finds it necessary to sell their home in a short sale, it is important to try to negotiate with the mortgage lender and ask them to approve not only the short sale, but to a waiver of the right to seek a deficiency judgment. If your lender agrees, this provision must be included in the short sale agreement.  That means, always get the waiver in writing.  The short sale agreement must expressly state that the transaction is in full satisfaction of the debt and/or that the lender waives its right to the deficiency.

  1. Make a Settlement Offer

The second option homeowners have is, if the mortgage lender does not agree to waive the deficiency, the homeowner can offer to settle the deficiency for a smaller amount. Many lenders agree to accept a smaller amount because collecting a deficiency is expensive and typically takes a long period of time.  It’s easier for lenders to accept a reduced lump sum, rather than going through the expensive and lengthy legal process to try to collect.  A homeowner can also negotiate to repay the reduced deficiency debt in installments, over time.

  1. Hope the Lender Won’t Sue for the Deficiency

If the homeowner was not successful in negotiating a waiver of deficiency or a reduced deficiency payment plan, the mortgage lender will likely call and send collection letters stating that the deficiency amount is owed. Collection letters typically come from a lawyer’s office or a collection agency.  However, without taking the homeowner (borrower) to court and getting an actual deficiency judgment, the lender cannot levy any bank accounts, garnish wages, or place judgment liens on other property the borrower may own.

To get a deficiency judgment, the lender must file an expensive lawsuit. Many borrowers, who are forced to complete a short sale of their homes to avoid a foreclosure, are judgment proof.  This means that they don’t have much money, wages or other property (assets) that a creditor can take to pay off the judgment. If a borrower can’t afford to pay the deficiency, there is a possibility that a mortgage lender won’t even bother filing a lawsuit against them.

  1. Declare Bankruptcy

The other possibility is to file for bankruptcy to eliminate the debt.  A Chapter 7 bankruptcy would totally discharge the deficiency relieving the borrower of the entire debt. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy will require a payment plan for 3 or 5 years to pay a portion of the total amount owed. Bankruptcy may also be the most pro-active way to alleviate the tax problem before the lender issues a 1099-C.  Income taxes are not typically discharged in Bankruptcy unless they are very old and a borrower can’t retroactively discharge a recent 1099-C tax debt.

On the other hand, if taxes or the deficiency are all the borrower owes, bankruptcy may not be the best option.  However, Bankruptcy may be something to consider when the borrower is facing a lot of debt they can’t pay, or when a borrower needs to eliminate the possibility facing a tax burden they simply can not afford to pay in the future.  To find out more about whether or not Bankruptcy is really the easy way out, click here.

September 14, 2017

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The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting new clients.  Call and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office offering your first confidential consultation, absolutely free of charge.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.com, visit us at Ginger B. Kelly on Facebook or feel free to call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2017, by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Bankruptcy, Chapter 7, Debt, Debt Collection, Deficiency Debt, Financial, Financial Planning, Foreclosure, Law, Lawsuits, Legal, Massachusetts, Massachusetts law, Mortgages, practical stuff, Short Sale, Uncategorized

Auto Loans and Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

Auto Loans after Bankruptcy

Auto Loans and Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

By Attorney Ginger Kelly

Going through a bankruptcy can be a stressful experience. And it can get even more stressful if you suddenly need to finance a car.

Clients often ask, “If I file for a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, can I get a car loan?”

My response is this:  “Well yes, and no.”  Then, I typically say, “Let me explain; yes, you can typically get a car loan after your debts have been discharged under a Chapter 7 liquidation bankruptcy, but your chances of getting a car loan approved is far less before you receive the final discharge disposition.

More about this…

Auto Loans and Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Filing and Discharge

The first thing to know is that a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Filing is the first thing filed at the beginning of a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.  The Discharge is the final disposition of the bankruptcy judge.  In other words, the Discharge is typically the last thing.

If you need a car loan, it’s better to wait until your Chapter 7 bankruptcy has been discharged before you apply.  Don’t apply for a loan after a Chapter 7 has been filed.  Wait.  A Chapter 7 bankruptcy is typically discharged around 60 to 75 days after the meeting of the creditors, also known as the 341 meeting. The meeting of the creditors typically happens 30 days after your bankruptcy petition is filed. A good bankruptcy attorney will explain this before you decide to file.  Find out more about whether or not bankruptcy may be right for you by reading, “Bankruptcy, the Easy Way Out. Really?”

Technically, you can apply for a car loan after the meeting of the creditors, but it’s very difficult to get this type of loan before the final discharge.  Almost no lenders and very few subprime lenders loan money to anyone in the midst of a Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Lenders do not want to give loans to people with open Chapter 7 bankruptcies because of the risk factor involved.  If a new debt was discharged, in the Chapter 7 liquidation process, the lender would lose out big time. Therefore, rather than placing themselves at such great risk, most lenders simply choose not to lend money for any reason, if you’ve filed but not received a final discharge.

Because lenders, including most subprime lenders, will not loan money without a final bankruptcy discharge, it’s best to wait until after the discharge to apply for an auto loan.

Car Loan Approval Post Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Discharge

While credit scores take a big hit after a Chapter 7 bankruptcy discharge, the discharge still offers the best option for a fresh start and a brand new financial beginning.  Most people in financial trouble are unable to rebuild their credit without filing for a Chapter 7 bankruptcy and typically take longer than the 10 years to rebuild.  After 10 years a Chapter 7 bankruptcy is removed from a credit report. This is why most chances are better for getting approved for a car loan after filing any Chapter 7 and receiving a discharge, rather than not filing for bankruptcy at all.

The essential step for getting credit, post-discharge or after the Chapter 7 bankruptcy final disposition, is working with a trustworthy car dealership who knows your situation and a variety of subprime lenders.  Only a few car dealers work with subprime lenders, others do not.  When dealers work only with traditional banks, most people with a Chapter 7 discharge will not get a car loan approved. When the dealer works with a variety of subprime lenders, chances for loan approval are greater. It’s really that simple.

This is why knowing your dealer is important as well as being careful not to get that hard inquiry on your credit report until you are relatively sure you will be approved. Having a hard inquiry “hit” on your credit report only complicates things. You can read more about this in my article, When Balance Transfers Make Good Sense. Unless there is a good chance you will be approved and you are willing to accept the terms of the loan, don’t bother applying for that car loan.  If all the cards are in line and you’ve received your discharge, go for it. Chances are better you will get approved.

August 14, 2017

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The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting new clients.  Call and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office offering your first confidential consultation, absolutely free of charge.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.com, visit us at Ginger B. Kelly on Facebook or feel free to call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2017, by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Auto Loans, Bankruptcy, Chapter 7, Debt, Financial, Financial Planning, Law, Legal, Massachusetts, Massachusetts law, practical stuff, Uncategorized

Bankruptcy, the Easy Way Out. Really?

chapter-7-bankruptcy-lawyer-chicago-illinois-790x300

By Ginger B. Kelly, Esq. Posted: May 16, 2017

In 2013 there were over a million bankruptcy filings.  In 2014, there were slightly less than a million.  Based on these filing numbers, something like 1 out of every 200 adults in the US file for bankruptcy (uscourts.gov). That’s a lot of people turning to bankruptcy.  Based on these figures, it appears as if bankruptcy seems like an easy way out, or is it?  Let’s consider a few things before making this assumption, like the implications of a filing and how bankruptcy compares to other debt relief options.

Is Bankruptcy Really the Easy Way Out?

Basically, a typical Chapter 7 bankruptcy (total liquidation) filing involves three basic steps.

#1.  Paperwork: To begin any bankruptcy case, a series of forms outlining your debts, assets, income, expenses, and related information need to be filed.  This is not like your ordinary tax return.  There are multiple papers that need to be filed. It’s a ton of paperwork.

#2. Trustee Meeting: After the petition, the schedules and all the paperwork has been filed, a court hearing date for a 341 Trustee Meeting will be scheduled.  The Trustee Meeting (also known as the Meeting of the Creditors), the bankruptcy trustee will ask you many questions.  In Massachusetts, you will be given notice that the meeting is recorded.  Most of the questions confirm the information in your paperwork.  The Trustee may ask you about how your debts and assets will be handled. For most Chapter 7 filers, the Trustee Meeting goes rather quickly, about 15 minutes or so.

#3.  Discharge – After the Trustee Meeting, assuming nothing goes wrong, there are no issues or complications, most of your debts will be discharged.  A few debts that will not be discharged are Student Loans, some IRS Tax Debt and a few other things.  Now the person filing Chapter 7 can begin their fresh start.

But wait…

Those three steps are an over-simplification of the process.  There is a lot more to it.  Many other important legal considerations must be dealt with, in a typical Chapter 7 bankruptcy case. This is why most people consult with a lawyer before beginning or considering any Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy case.

Even when the case is closed, there’s a lot to consider.  Credit card debts, medical debts, payday loans and most other unsecured debts, are gone, but other debts like student loans may not ever go away.  Secured debts, like car loans and home mortgages can also go away.  But if a person whats to keep their home or car or both, they will need to reaffirm those debts and continue making those payments.  Sometimes, a reaffirmation hearing is required.

So why is Bankruptcy complicated?

Primarily, there are two big potential problems, maybe more.

#1.  Valuable property at Risk.  Because a bankruptcy trustee will evaluate both debts and assets, to determine if some debt could be repaid by liquidating (selling) your assets, a filer runs the risk of losing some important assets.

For most people, the two primary things they don’t want to lose are automobiles and real estate.  These two assets are the easiest to sell.  If the value of a filer’s home or car (or both) is much greater than the loan you used to buy it, that property could potentially be sold to repay creditors.

For more on how this works, and on the exemption laws that protect your property in bankruptcy, see this article, Should I Choose Massachusetts or Federal Bankruptcy Exemptions.

#2.  Effect on credit scores. The other issues most people worry about when it comes to filing for bankruptcy is how this affects credit scores.  Everyone knows any bankruptcy will have a serious impact on a FICO score for several years.  The degree of impact depends upon how good or bad a filer’s credit is the day they file their petition.  The better the credit the more significant the drop will be.  If a filer’s credit was shot to begin with, or on the low side, (which is true for most people who file for bankruptcy), the effect will be significant, but less than a filer with good credit.

To sum it all up, when a person files for bankruptcy, they can expect that obtaining loans right away won’t be so easy.  Often, credit cards and even car loans are available, but typically at very high rates of interest.  However, when a filer sticks to a reasonable budget, and pays their bills on time, they will be off to a fresh start and better credit over time.

Alternatives to Bankruptcy.

It’s been said that bankruptcy is sort of the “ultimate weapon” of debt relief.  But this means that bankruptcy should only be used when other options fail.  A discharge of debt via bankruptcy is only available once every seven or more years; bankruptcy is not something a person should try first.  Some people work with credit management companies to reduce debt, but I do not recommend this in most cases.  Others try asking family for help or they find another source of income, like a second job.  Adjusting one’s budget is always a good plan.  Do this before considering filing for bankruptcy.

Next Steps…

For those who have tried every option and have no realistic alternatives, then it’s time to schedule a consultation with a bankruptcy lawyer. Your first consultation should not cost a dime and it’s a good time to find out if bankruptcy will work in your situation.  When you meet with your lawyer, be sure to ask a few important questions.

  • Based on my income and job situation, do I qualify for bankruptcy?
  • Can I get rid of all my debts in bankruptcy?
  • Is property I own (bring a list of a few big items) unprotected or at risk?

A quick consultation with a good lawyer will help you understand a few things bankruptcy can do to help and what the risks would likely be or whether or not there are better options.

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The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting new clients.  Call and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office offering your first confidential consultation, absolutely free of charge.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.com, visit us at Ginger B. Kelly on Facebook or feel free to call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2017, by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Bankruptcy, Debt, Debt Collection, Filing, Massachusetts, Massachusetts law, practical stuff, Rhode Island, Student Loan Debt, Uncategorized

Should I choose Massachusetts or Federal Bankruptcy Exemptions?

choice

Should I choose Massachusetts or Federal Bankruptcy Exemptions?

By Attorney Ginger B. Kelly, April 1, 2017

Good news for Massachusetts residents. You have a choice weather or to protect your property using Massachusetts or Federal exemptions.

In many ways, Massachusetts is a great state to live in. Here, Bankruptcy filers have a choice whether to protect or to “exempt” property using Massachusetts bankruptcy exemptions or the federal bankruptcy exemptions.

In a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, any property not exempted can be sold by the bankruptcy trustee and the proceeds used to pay creditors.  Nonexempted property can be kept, in a Chapter 13 case, but payment must be made for the value of that property, under the terms of a three or five-year payment plan.

For Massachusetts filers who have significant equity in their homes, the Massachusetts exemptions are substantial.  Federal law offers a larger wildcard exemption.  Since it is difficult to examine which exemptions work best, it’s very important to look at each exemption closely.

Mixing Massachusetts Exemptions with Federal Exemptions is not permissible.

In Massachusetts, a filer must choose one set of exemptions only.  When figuring out which set of exemption laws is best for your circumstances, mixing and matching is not allowed.

Doubling Exemptions for Married Couples.

For married couples filing, you can double the exemptions, apart from the homestead exemption for under the Massachusetts and federal exemption rules. In Massachusetts, the rule is typically called Exemption Doubling.

Which to choose, Massachusetts or Federal Exemptions?

The answer to this question depends quite heavily on your specific situation and set of circumstances.  For some filers, more property will be kept using the Massachusetts exemptions. For example, Massachusetts has more favorable exemptions for your house, your car, your clothing, other household items (like appliances and furniture), and tools of the trade. *

How do I keep from losing my home?

For Massachusetts bankruptcy filers, Massachusetts exemptions are excellent for homeowners.  Homeowners who have filed and recorded with the registry of deeds, a properly executed homestead declaration are entitled to receive a $500,000 exemption. If no homestead declaration is recorded, the automatic exemption is still a hefty $125,000.

As mentioned before, just like the federal law exemption, the homestead exemption cannot be doubled for married couples filing jointly.

In the alternative, the federal law exemption for a home is only $23,675 and $47,350 for married couples filing jointly.

So, the key to keeping your home in Massachusetts is, if there is more than $23,675 worth of equity in your home, and you want to keep it, the Massachusetts exemptions are the best choice.

 How do I keep from losing my car?

Under the federal exemptions, $3,775.00 is allowed for automobile exemptions.  This means, that if the Kelly Blue book value of your car exceeds #3,775.00, you may want to choose the Massachusetts exemptions.  Under the Massachusetts bankruptcy exemption law, $7,500.00 is allowed for the motor vehicle exemption. If a filer is over 60 years old or disabled, the Massachusetts exemption allows a $15,000.00 motor vehicle exemption.

If a filer’s car is worth more than $3775.00, or there is more than $3,775.00 worth of equity in that car, and they want to keep it, a filer would be better off using the Massachusetts exemptions.

How do I keep all my clothing?

Under the Federal exemptions, a filer can keep $12,625.00 in personal property, which includes clothing.  But the maximum value for any one piece would be only $600.00.  In Massachusetts, a filer can keep all of their necessary clothing in bankruptcy. So, under the Massachusetts exemption rules, a filer will likely keep more because the $12,625 federal exemption includes all other personal property as well, like furniture, appliances, housewares and other consumer goods.

How do I keep my appliances and furniture?

As mentioned above, the Federal exemption rules allow for only $12,625.00 in personal property. If a filer uses the Massachusetts bankruptcy exemptions, they will be allowed to keep any necessary beds and bedding, one heating unit, one stove and one refrigerator and one hot water heater. An additional $15,000.00 in home furnishings can be exempted, if they are necessary for the filer and the filer’s family.

Using the more plentiful Massachusetts exemption makes sense for most filers.  However, if a filer has an extra refrigerator in their garage, it is unlikely the second refrigerator would be considered a necessity. If the second refrigerator is really that important, the federal exemptions may be a better choice, as long the value is that second refrigerator is less than $600.

How do I keep the tools I use for my job?

Filers in Massachusetts are in good shape when they have tools of the trade or tools used while doing business. The Massachusetts exemptions allow a $5,000 exemption for tools of the trade and an additional $5,000 for any materials used in their business. Federal law allows only a $2,375.00 exemption for tools of the trade. So, if a filer has more than $2,375 of tools and materials, used for their trade or business, then the Massachusetts exemptions would be the better choice.

Are Federal Exemptions Ever Better Than Massachusetts Exemptions?

In their entirety, the federal exemptions are less generous than many Massachusetts exemptions.  However, there are a few exceptions. One exception is that the federal exemption law will protect slightly more jewelry and a larger wildcard exemption.  This may benefit many filers, depending on their situation and what they want to keep.

How do I keep my valuable jewelry?

Since Massachusetts law offers only a $1,225.00 exemption and federal law a $1,600.00, a filer may choose Massachusetts exemptions over federal. $Granted, 375.00 worth of equity in jewelry isn’t a huge savings, but if it is important to the filer that certain jewelry is retained, the federal exemptions may be a better choice.

Which Wildcard Exemption do I chose?

Wildcard exemptions are used to protect assets not listed as exempt. In other words, a wildcard can be used to exempt nonexempt assets.

Per federal exemption rules, the federal wildcard exemption is currently valued at $1,250.00 plus any unused portion of the federal homestead exemption up to $11,850.00. * If a filer doesn’t need to claim their full homestead exemptions, they will be able to use up to $13,100.00 total.  If the filer has no homestead exemption, only $1,250.00 can be used to exempt nonexempt assets.

In Massachusetts, the wildcard exemption is different. Per the Massachusetts exemption rules, the wildcard exemption is $1,000.00, plus up to $5,000.00 of any unused portion of the total exemptions provided under the $15,000 household furniture exemption, the $5,000 tools of the trade exemption and the $7,500 motor vehicle exemption. This is good news for certain Massachusetts filers. Under the Massachusetts exemption rules, filers can keep up to $6,000 in nonexempt assets.

Now that I know more about the exemption rules, why do I need a Bankruptcy Attorney?

In Massachusetts, there is no one-size-fits all bankruptcy.  Even though Massachusetts law offers a more generous exemption package, federal law may be best for different filers for so many reasons. Thorough research of both sets of exemptions and all assets are critical, before making decisions. Attorneys can remove uncertainty, confusion and doubt and help you determine the best way to protect your home, your car and your personal property.

Hiring a competent, experienced bankruptcy lawyer to handle your case will save not only you a headache, but it may also end up saving you money. When everything is completed properly the first time, bankruptcy attorneys save you money. Mistakes are costly. Mistakes not only affect your time, but your finances and may end up costing your case.

Speak to an attorney who offers a free first consultation. Earlier I wrote about, “how to find an experienced and vetted attorney, FREE!”  This offers good advice on how to find an attorney on a budget or pro-bono (which means free).  Best of luck to you.

*NOTE: All the bankruptcy exemptions mentioned, above, may differ and are subject to change on or before April 2019.

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The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting new clients.  Call and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office offering your first confidential consultation, absolutely free of charge.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.com, visit us at Ginger B. Kelly on Facebook or feel free to call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  All electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2017, by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Bankruptcy, Debt, Federal Law, Filing, Financial, Law, Legal, Massachusetts, Massachusetts law, Uncategorized

Documents Needed Prior to the 341 Trustee Meeting (aka Meeting of the Creditors)

documents-required

Just the other day I was driving to my own client’s 341 Trustee meeting in Worcester, Massachusetts and I thought, most people have no clue what documents are needed prior to most trustee meetings.  So, here is the short list.

The documents you will need are generally the same whether you are filing a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy.  However, specific documentation requirements are something different in most every local jurisdiction.  Be sure to check your local rules or contact your attorney in your specific situation.  Your attorney can notify the trustee and find out what is needed.

Tax Returns

Minimally, and most importantly, your last year’s tax return is required to be delivered to the trustee minimally seven days prior to your 341 meeting.  Local rules and trustees vary on what is required prior to the meeting.  If you do not provide this to the trustee, prior to your meeting, your case could be dismissed.

Other than this, you will typically need to provide copies of your tax returns or tax transcripts for the last two years during your meeting.  I have found, over the years, that it is best if you sign your returns.  If you have tax returns that haven’t been filed, you will need to explain why you were not required to file.  If you did not have a valid reason for not filing, most trustees, especially in Chapter 13 cases, will require you to file your taxes and provide copies before concluding or approving your case.  Again, some trustees may require more tax returns while others may ask only for your most recent one.

Income

If you are an employee, you will need copies of pay stubs (also known as payment advances) for the six-month period prior to the bankruptcy.  You will also need your past two years W-2 forms.  If you collect Social Security or Social Security Disability Income, you will need your award letter.  If you are self-employed, you will probably need to provide a profit and loss statement for the same six-month period as well as business bank statements to verify the amounts on the statement. If you have income from other sources such as rental properties or unemployment, proof of this income is also required.

Real Estate

If you own real estate, a valuation of the property is required.  Generally, I recommend my client’s get a broker’s price opinion, or a full appraisal, but this depends upon the situation.  In some cases, this is not needed.  Mortgage statements showing current loan balances, deeds of trust, and proof of home insurance may also be required.

Vehicles

If you have titled vehicles, such as an automobile, you will be required to provide a recent copy of your vehicle registration.  I also recommend you have proof of insurance, and valuation information, such as a KBB (Kelly Blue Book) valuation (you can get this online). If you have a car loan, a recent loan statement showing how much you owe and what your monthly payment is, will be important.  For other titled property, such as boats or trucks, recent valuation may also be required.

Retirement Accounts and Other Bank Accounts

Recent bank account statements (checking and savings) and retirement account statements are usually very important to provide to the trustee.  Your attorney should have these.

Miscellaneous

If you have any other special circumstances, like child support or alimony, you will need to provide proof of these expenses.  Typically a copy of the judgment, order or agreement will be sufficient

Proof of Identification and Social Security Number   

This is very important.  When you go to your hearing with the trustee, you will be asked to show proof of identification.  So you must have these two things ready for the trustee at the beginning of your meeting.  Identification must be valid and include a recent photo.  Examples are a current state-issued ID card, a current driver’s license or valid passport.  You will also need to show proof of your social security number.  These documents are typically your state-issued social security card or employee-issued W-2 form.

That’s it. Now you are ready for your Meeting with the Trustee. If you have any questions or need any help, please give me a call. My direct line is 508-784-1014 (yes, this is the number that goes directly to me, personally).  I’ll be happy to set up your first free consultation, absolutely free.

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The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting new clients.  Call and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office offering your first confidential consultation, absolutely free of charge.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.com, visit us at Ginger B. Kelly on Facebook or feel free to call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2015, 2016, 2017, by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Bankruptcy, Debt, Debt Collection, Filing, Financial, Law, Legal, Massachusetts, Massachusetts law, Uncategorized

When will the Massachusetts Ballot Questions become law?

ballot-questions

Now we know the election results in Massachusetts.  We had a few ballot questions, four to be exact.  Ballot questions are not laws that deal with taxes, but they are real issues that deal with policy. Ballot questions are policy issues that affect the quality of life in Massachusetts.

To understand a bit about ballot question law in Massachusetts, and when these questions may or may not become law, it is important to understand a little about the ballot question drafting process.

Each ballot question, also called an “indirect initiated state statute question“, is essentially a proposal regarding some sort of Massachusetts policy, made by concerned citizens.  Law-makers of either the Senate or the House of Representatives or both do not draft these types of laws.  Concerned citizens draft the proposed laws.

Concerned citizens take information on the topics that are important to them and draft proposals on the law.  The drafts may be redrafted a few times until the final draft comes out in the form of a ballot question.  The ballot question proposals must have petition signatures.  Then, the Massachusetts state legislatures, the Massachusetts State Attorney General and the Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) all play a roll in the approval process.  In the final step, the ballot question proposals or petitions finally become approved as Massachusetts state ballot questions.  If approved, the Massachusetts ballot question will become law.  Learn more about this process, here.

If approved, the dates the laws will take effect are drafted into the law itself.  The way the law was written or drafted, is the way the law will be interpreted.  The dates these laws will take effect or become actual enforceable state law, are included in the draft petitions.  In other words, effective dated are always drafted or written directly into the petitions that become final ballot questions.

Below, is the list of Ballot questions Massachusetts citizens voted on November 8th, 2016 and when they will become law.

Question 1 · Allows the state gaming commission to issue an additional slot parlor license.  Massachusetts voted No, by 61%

Since a “No” vote will leave the law as-is, there is no question as to when this law will be enacted.

Question 2 · Allows the Board of Education to approve up to 12 new charter schools or enrollment expansions in current charter schools each year.  Massachusetts voted No, by 62%.

Since a “No” vote will leave the charter school cap as it stands, there is no question as to when this law will be enacted.  There are no changes to the law.

Question 3 · Prohibits selling farm products from animals not raised in spaces that meet a minimum size requirement.  Massachusetts voted Yes, by 78%

Because this law was approved, this law will go into effect on January 1, 2022.

Question 4 · Allows the possession, use, distribution, and cultivation of limited amounts of marijuana by persons age 21 and older.  Massachusetts voted Yes, by 54%.

Because this law has passed, this law will take effect December 15, 2016 and stores could open by early 2018.

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The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting new clients.  Call and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office offering your first confidential consultation, absolutely free of charge.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.wordpress.com, or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We can not stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2015, 2016 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Law, Legal, Massachusetts, Massachusetts law, New Law, News, Trending

Basic Estate Planning in Massachusetts

last-willProtecting loved ones and establishing wishes prior to death is pretty basic and important part of life.  Sometimes families with children don’t realize how essential it is to select a guardian.  Oftentimes grandparents would like to leave a legacy to their grandchildren or skip a generation.  We all need to think about our essential health care and financial decisions now, before these kinds decisions are made for us.

If you do not have a will, or if your will is invalid, you will die what is called, “intestate.” In cases when a person dies intestate, their probate assets are distributed according to statutory guidelines.  These guidelines are extremely rigid. When a person dies intestate, the process of distributing assets does not take into consideration any of the wishes and desires the person who died (the decedent) or the family.  Furthermore, this process takes a considerable amount of time.

In Massachusetts, there are four basic legal documents needed to protect a basic estate and avoid the hassle, time and expense of probating an estate for those who die intestate.  A basic estate is an estate valued at less than $1 million dollars in total assets.  These four documents are:  a Will, a Durable Power of Attorney, a Health Care Proxy and a Health Care Directive.

  1. The Will

A will is a document that you use to specify your wishes as to how to distribute your assets after you pass away.  Your assets are your personal property and real property, like your home, automobiles, bank accounts, and other personal items.  For a will to be legally valid, it must be signed in front of at least two witnesses and notarized.

The will also designates an executor for your estate.  An executor is the person whom you choose to administer your estate.   An executor should be reliable and trustworthy, because they will have broad powers over all of your assets after you have passed away.

After appointment of the executor, a will lists individual items that will be distributed to certain individuals.  A will can designate anything to be left to anyone, as long as the conditions and items are lawful.

The last section of a basic will usually involves paying of taxes, debts and expenses like funeral expenses and things that must be paid by your estate, which is part of Probate.  Only probated items will be included in your will.  Non-probated items will pass by operation of law.

A non-probate item is anything that passes by operation of law, like a contract or an insurance policy or jointly held property, like property held by tenancy by the entirety or joint tenants.  Many homes and bank accounts are held jointly.  Property and assets held jointly with someone else passes automatically to the other person and doesn’t pass by will and is considered a probate asset.

A few things that may pass by contract are life insurance policies, retirement accounts and most annuities.  The general rule is, property that has a beneficiary designation is something that passes by contract.  Therefore, property with a beneficiary designation is not a probate asset.

Even if your home is owned jointly, and a provision in your will designates something otherwise, the provision in your will, generally, will be ignored in most cases.

  1. Durable Power of Attorney

A will is an instrument that helps people know what to do with your things after you pass away, but a Durable Power of Attorney (DPOA) is a planning tool, or legal instrument, for use during your lifetime to provide for your wishes, if you were to become incapacitated.

A DPOA is a document that gives another person of your designation the right, (or power) to act on your behalf.  Essentially, anything you can do, your attorney-in-fact can do for you.  The Attorney-in-fact is the person who is designated by you, in the DPOA.   A DPOA controls your estate finances.  For example, your attorney-in-fact can act as your representative to withdraw money from your bank account to pay for your hospital bills and pay your mortgage, if you were to become unable to do so, because you became incapacitated.  A DPOA can be temporary or permanent, depending upon your mental and physical state and capacity.

A DPOA is a very important part of successful estate planning, because without someone to act on your financial behalf, you might not have access to resources you need when you need them.  A person who is completely trustworthy should be designated your attorney-in-fact.

  1. Health Care Proxy

A health care proxy (HCP) is similar to a DPOA, except for one thing.  The HCP does not designate someone to make financial decisions on your behalf, if you were to become incapacitated.  Your HCPO designates someone to make medical decisions on your behalf, if you were to become incapacitated.

Choosing a responsible HCP is also very important.  A HCP is someone you can trust to act as you would act, or do as you would do regarding medical decisions.  Oftentimes, family members are not always the best choice.  If a family member is likely to impose their own will, rather than follow your wishes, chose another person as your HCP.

  1. Health Care Directive

A health care directive (HCD) is also known as a living will and is the only document in your basic estate planning package that has no legal power or effect.  A HCD is a document that guides your HCP as to your own wishes and desires for Health Care treatment.  In the HCD, you can choose to list the different types of treatments you want and what treatment you wish to refuse. Since some people would not want to live if their brain was not functioning, for example.  The HCD is the place to tell your HCP your wishes regarding whether or not to resuscitate, in this instance.

Since the HCD isn’t a legally binding document in Massachusetts, your HCP can make decisions that override any provisions in your HCD. However, a HCD is a useful tool that guides doctors and family members during times of medical decision-making.

Advanced Estate Planning

Estates involving over $1 million dollars in assets require something more than basic estate planning.  Massachusetts has an estate tax on estates that exceed $1 million dollars, so tax planning is an important and a valuable tool.  With a proper tax plan, even if your estate exceeds $1 million dollars, estate taxes are often avoided.

Tax planning and advance estate planning typically involves the use of different types of trusts. Tax planning and advance estate planning involves the four documents, used in basic estate planning, plus the use of any additional needed trust instruments.

Estate Planning Costs:

By executing a will and signing a couple other basic documents, you could save your loved ones loads of aggravation and unnecessary expenses.  The value of this is something that can’t be counted in pure dollars and cents.  Nevertheless, the price range for a basic estate plan is wide.  Attorneys will often charge anywhere from $800 to $4,000 for a basic estate plan.

Typically, Attorney Kelly’s fees are very reasonable and will only charge, depending upon your specific situation and other factors like size and complexity of the estate.  Options for pro-bono (free) and reduced fee legal services are also available for those in financial need.

Call the Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly now and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office who offers your first confidential consultation is always free.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.wordpress.com, or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We can not stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2015, 2016 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

2 Comments

November 4, 2016 · 11:00 am

Gone to the Dogs in Massachusetts

Herbie, Acrilic Portrait by Artist Annie Salness http://www.anniesalness.com/herbie.html

Herbie, Acrilic Portrait by Artist Annie Salness http://www.anniesalness.com/herbie.html

Gone to the Dogs: Service Animal Law and Leash Law in Massachusetts

Sometime last year, in the small town of Oxford Massachusetts, a Veteran with a service dog entered a restaurant. The restaurant was very small and very local. The restaurant owner was also a local business man. The restaurant owner didn’t know the Veteran and visa versa. Neither did the restaurant owner know why the dog came into the restaurant with the Veteran, a very average looking man. The Veteran wasn’t blind.  He didn’t appear physically disabled.  The Veteran had no physical impairments, visible to most people.  Unfortunately, this is where the trouble started.

Apparently, the service dog was not appreciated inside the restaurant owners place of business.  People were eating there.  Food was prepared there.  The restaurant owner was so concerned, that he asked the Veteran to remove his dog.  The Veteran protested.  The Veteran tried to explain his situation and the circumstances.  The restaurant owner didn’t believe him.  Others chimed in. It all turned into one big mess. According to local news stories, the restaurant owner did not understand why the service dog was required by the Veteran or what the Veteran’s motivation for having the dog inside was.

Even so, this one simple transaction turned into a situation. It wasn’t pretty. The restaurant owner and the Veteran exchanged words. People were angry. The Veteran was asked to leave. Then, the police were called in. The Restaurant owner was upset, very upset. Patrons left the restaurant.

The next day, all the nasty details were reported in the local news paper. The news sparked even more interest. Dog owners, people with disabilities and Veterans from far and wide formed groups to protest the tiny restaurant in Oxford. Dogs dogs and more dogs, come with dog owners to voice their opinion. A few people sided with the restaurant owner. Even so, bad publicity is never a good thing. The restaurant owner lost customers. The bad publicity was not good for business and embarrassing to say the least.

In this instance, the service dog was used as not only a companion for the Vet but a tool to help him manage his disability, post traumatic stress disorder. The Veteran’s PSTD was a medical condition, directly related to his service. The restaurant owner never heard of this before. The restaurant owner made an incorrect assumption that the Veteran was not disabled.

Eventually, after a few very emotionally charged discussions, the restaurant owner apologized.  His apology was made public.  The public apology was a newsworthy story of success and communications, based on the efforts of the Veteran and the restaurant owner.  The Veteran accepted the apology.  They both shook hands. The Veteran and his service dog were welcomed back into the restaurant. The two became friends.

Eventually, life went back to normal in this sleepy little Massachusetts town in Southern Worcester County. People stopped protesting. Newspapers stopped reporting. Oxford returned to its regular state of normalcy.

This story sheds a little light into various legal reasons why someone would need to have a dog in a public place. It also sheds light as to a few things a dog owners must consider, before they bring their dogs into public places. Every town or jurisdiction in Massachusetts has important local rules or regulations pertaining to health, housing, service dogs and pets.

Other important laws regarding dogs or “service animals” can be found in the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) the Fair Housing Amendments Act (“FHAA”) and the Air Carrier Access Act (“ACAA”). It’s important to have a good understanding about these laws, especially if you are a dog owner and a business owner.

The Federal Code of Regulations (“CFR”) provides an understand of terms like, public accommodations and service animals. According to Title 28 CFR Section 36.302, business owners must make public accommodations to serve people with disabilities and those with limited capacity to access services. Subsection (c) talks about Service Animals. Service “animals” includes service dogs. The Veteran’s dog, who entered the Oxford restaurant with the Veteran, was a licensed service dog. Generally, people with disabilities have documentation that shows a dog is a service dog. If need be, service dog handlers should be able to present service dog identification to public business owners.

Generally, a public accommodation is the modification of policies, practices or procedures that allows people with disabilities to use their service animal on the premises. Under the CFR, a store or business owner should do whatever is reasonable to permit service animals onto their business premises so that the service animal can help the disabled person shop and conduct business as best they can. This is the right thing to do.

There are only a few exceptions as to why a business owner may exclude a service animal, under CFR law.  First, a service animal can be excluded if the service animal is out of control. If the animal’s handler does not take effective action to control the animal, the business owner may ask the service animal and the handler or owner, to remove the animal. In this situation, the business owner is not required to make a public accommodation for the service animal.

Next, if a service animal is not housebroken, for example a dog urinates or defecates in unacceptable areas, the store owner is not required to accommodate that service animal. This makes sense. Another exception is that a business or store owner is not required to accommodate the disabled person in caring for or supervising the service animal. In other words, the owner/handler is responsible for supervision of their own service animal if they want to take the service animal in public places.

Another key aspect of service animal law is that a service animal under must be on leash, harness, or other tether. If the handler is unable to put the animal on a leash or harness or tether, because it is not safe for the service animal, then the service animal must be under the handlers control by some other means. Again, in another sense, this means that if the owner/handler can not control the service animal, the animal may be excluded from the business premises. Examples of this sort of legal control are voice, hand signals or some other effective means of control. There is lots of guidance and case law on means of control.

For dog owners in general, it is important to note that federal law does not always trump local leash laws or ordinances. Many Massachusetts town ordinances and state laws regarding leash laws differ and are dependent upon each situation. This means that each fact pattern, or individual situation, can be different and may involve alternative duties, responsibilities and liabilities. If you are unsure about the leash laws and dog ordinances in your particular jurisdiction and situation, ask an attorney. Your attorney should be more than happy to research the laws for you and help you to understand how to obey your local laws in your area.  Taking to your attorney is a good way to become a more informed and responsible dog owner.

When I was growing up, I had the opportunity to watch service dogs being trained in the streets and on the sidewalks in Morristown, NJ. A school for service dogs for the blind was nearby.  Watching service dogs being trained was a beautiful sight. The dogs were harnessed and steady. They peered into the eyes of their handlers. The dogs were lively, yet always sat when asked and at the appropriate times.  The dogs walked quietly. They always stayed close to their handler. Unlike most dogs I’ve ever seen, these dogs didn’t randomly sniff at people and bark at things. The service dogs did not jump. There was no dog feces or urine in any public places. Never did these dogs intimidate or scare people or children. They didn’t even bark at other dogs.

Service dogs at work ignore all sources of stimulation, like other dogs, children and food. Service dogs are attentive, only to their handlers and the work they do in each moment.  Watching service dogs and their handlers is a treat.

I remember once walking up to a service dog, wanting to pet the dog.  I was about 10 years old at the time.  My mother told me, no.  I was a bit crushed, because I really love dogs, so I asked my mother why?  My mother explained to me that often handlers of service dogs ask visitors not to touch or pet the service dog. I understood and listened to my mother. I also wanted to encourage the dogs to be good. From that point on, I never touch a service dog unless I first get permission from the dog’s handler or owner.  I do this for all dogs now, hoping to help all dogs mind their manners.

Because I am an adult now, and an attorney, I understand most laws and policies of service dog handlers.  When service dogs are “at work,” they must be allowed to remain quiet and attentive to their handler. Petting the dog is a big distraction. This is important to know, for both dog owners and non dog owners.

The CFR discusses what to do when a store owner or business owner, for good reason, is unable to make a reasonable accommodation for the disabled person’s service animal. According to the Code, if a public accommodation properly excludes a service animal under 28 CFR Section 36.302(c)(2), the business shall give the individual with a disability the opportunity to obtain goods, services, and accommodations without having the service animal on the premises. This means that the store owner has a legal duty to assist and accommodate the disabled person, reasonably, even if store owner or handler must keep the service animal off the premises for whatever reason.

Appropriate, respectful and lawful exclusion or inclusion of dogs in and out of business is the right thing to do. This does not mean all dogs must be legally accommodated in all places. Each situation is different, under the law. It is not always appropriate, lawful or prudent to take your dog shopping in most public places. Massachusetts state and local health and housing regulations may prohibit pets, animals and dogs from many public places. Likewise, not all dogs can be excluded from public places and businesses, with only a few exceptions.

In Massachusetts, civil laws may impose strict liability onto dog owners for any and all harm to others or property, caused by the dog they own. This means that if a dog causes harm or damage to people or property in Massachusetts, the owner of the dog will be held liable for any damages. Dog owners also have a legal duty to prevent their dogs from harassing or frightening others. This includes not permitting your dog to frighten children with sensitivities and people with disabilities. It is also important for dog owners to know, property owners are not legally obligated to accommodate dogs, unless they are service animals.  Then, there are local leash laws.

The town of Charlton Massachusetts is the town my law office is located.  In Charlton, dogs are not permitted to be outside without a leash or a harness.  Dogs must be on a leash, even when the handler or owner is not the property owner. Property owners have a duty to keep all dogs visiting their property on leash, even when property owners don’t own any dogs. Property owners failing to keep all dogs on-leash, visiting or otherwise, may face legal consequences. Although it may seem different or strange, obeying leash laws in Charlton is the responsibility of property owners in Charlton. The same type of leash law ordinance applies to West Brookfield, Oxford and Dudley, Massachusetts and other cities and towns.

Leash laws are one reason why it’s a good idea for dog owners to talk to the host or property owner when visiting, before bringing dogs on the premises. Before allowing your dog off-leash in any area, communicate with host or check the policy of the property owner. Good dog owners not only genuinely care for their dogs, they care about people. Responsible dog owners learn what to do in each situation, before bringing their dog.

Personally, one of my favorite past-times is walking near the Buffamville Dam in Oxford. This is a good spot for me to get my doggie fix.  Almost always, someone is walking their dog.  I ask if I can pet most all dogs on leash.  This is fun, to me.  It’s also fun for families and children to play at the park and at skateboard parks in Charlton and Oxford. Wherever permitted, dogs are found on-leash.  Attending local football games or taking a child to the YMCA playground in Southbridge is an awesome experience.  Keep in mind, however, it’s not always wise or permissible to bring a dog.

If it isn’t permissible, reasonable, healthy or legal to take your dog to a public place, think twice. Summer is upon us. I’ts time to enjoy the outdoors.  Bring your dog to outdoor places only when it makes sense.  Show respect for others.  Showing respect is not only good for you, it’s best for your dog.

If you are a business owner or a pet owner, and you do not fully understand your legal rights, the health regulations, the story of the Oxford restaurant owner and the Veteran is a very good lesson. Local leash laws and dog ordinances, and laws about service dog accommodations are important to know. Please, talk to your attorney if you need help in any of these areas of the law. Being concerned about others is good for business. Knowing the law and our responsibilities under the law is our duty and a good way to gain trust and respect from others. Trusted and respected business owners in Massachusetts are such a great benefit.

If you are a pet owner or dog owner or have been harmed in some way because of an out-of-control animal or a dog, please call your attorney right away. Consider the statute of limitations law in your jurisdiction. Plan to contact your attorney before the time to take legal action runs out.

If you need an attorney, and need experienced and approachable help, feel free to call our office. We are here for you. All consultations are confidential. First consultations are free.

Enjoy your spring.  Enjoy your summer.  Enjoy your dog and the great outdoors!

About Artist Annie Saliness 

The artist who painted the featured illustration “Herbie” is Annie Saliness.  Annie is an Artist full of hope, grit and true artistic talent. During her career, Annie had a stroke which took away her ability to use her right hand and more.  Annies’ struggles, triumphs and victories over her disability and other things, is a wonderful story. Annies story is as beautiful as her art. To read more about Annie, her triumph over adversity and more, follow this link > http://www.oregonlive.com/north-of-26/index.ssf/2012/10/cedar_mill_artist_annie_salnes.html

More of Annie’s artwork can be found on Annie’s website at http://www.anniesalness.com.  Take a look at Annie’s art and things. You’ll be glad you did.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island.  Her law practice is focused on consumer finance and bankruptcy.  However, Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work.  On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.  To find out more visit, www.attorneykelly.squarespace.com or http://www.attorneykelly.wordpress.com, or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We can not stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2015 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under animal law, business law, civil law, Massachusetts law, Massachusetts town ordinance law

Slip and Fall, an Icy Tail in Massachusetts

February 19, 2015, (republished February 13, 2017)

It’s official, Worcester County, Massachusetts is the snowiest place in the US.  It’s only February 19th and so far this year we’ve had over 107 inches of snow!  This means that people who live in Massachusetts, particularly in Worcester County, are on double duty to prevent injuries from slip and fall accidents.  Here’s the “scoop” on clearing the snow.

John Cole Northeast American Gothic

In the past, Massachusetts law regarding snow and ice injuries exempted property owners from liability if someone was injured as a result of snow that naturally accumulated and had not been cleared.

However, in 2010 things changed.  Pursuant to Papadopoulos v. Target Corporation, SJC-10529 (July 26, 2010), the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court changed this nearly 100-year old rule. Now, Massachusetts property owners must remove snow and ice to protect others and to protect themselves from slip and fall liability.

What does this mean to you?  Homeowners in Massachusetts have a responsibility to clear the snow and ice from their driveways, walkways and other areas of their property. It is important to make sure your family and others, such as friends, postal carriers and delivery workers, can safely visit your property without slipping and falling.  If someone slips and falls on the ice or snow, on your property, you could be held liable for damages even if that person was not invited onto your property.

If you have issues, regarding a slip and fall injury, or snow and ice buildup, ice dams or something under contract, it’s always best to contact your attorney.  If you need an attorney, give me a call.  I always enjoy listening, answering questions and speaking with others.  Your first consultation is free and our driveway and walkway is free and clear of snow and ice. Just sayin’ 😉

ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit www.attorneykelly.com, or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We can not stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2015, 2016, 2017 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

1 Comment

February 20, 2015 · 3:33 am