Category Archives: Law

Bankruptcy for Smart People

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Bankruptcy for Smart People

By Attorney Ginger B. Kelly, September 13, 2018

For some people, bankruptcy is a very helpful tool.  Bankruptcy was intended to help people in debt to recover, get a fresh start and begin again to regain financial stability.

Why File Bankruptcy?

People file for bankruptcy for a variety of reasons.  Some want to save their homes from foreclosure.  Some want to keep their wages from being garnished.  Many want to get rid of (or avoid) liens placed on their homes by creditors.  Many are struggling with medical debt, credit card debt and other unsecured loans.  Some have financial trouble due to medical issues, loss of employment, divorce, the death of a family member and a host of unforeseen accidents and problems.  Sometimes people struggle due to poor judgment or in making unwise financial decisions.  Whatever the reason, there are essentially two types of bankruptcies for most individuals and married couples.  Most people (not businesses) file under particular bankruptcy Chapters, Chapter 7 and Chapter 13.

Chapter 7

Chapter 7 bankruptcy is relatively straightforward and is sometimes called a “straight” bankruptcy.  You can file, under Chapter 7, if you are an individual or a married couple but you have to qualify first.  To qualify under Chapter 7, income and expenses must meet certain guidelines and the filers must complete a state approved, online or telephonic credit counseling course.  A Chapter 7 bankruptcy is often called a liquidation of assets, although very rarely are all the assets of a person or a family actually sold, or liquidated, by the Bankruptcy Trustee.  The Trustee is the person working for the US Trustee’s office.  The Trustee is the attorney looking out for the creditor’s side, or working on behalf of all the creditors. Most filer’s assets are exempt or protected under state or federal bankruptcy laws.  Under Chapter 7, most debts are discharged within about six months from the date of filing, provided there are little or no underlying issues or problems.

Chapter 13

Under a Chapter 13, an individual or a married couple must also qualify and take a course before filing, but the difference is that they will need to make payments to creditors into a five or three year repayment plan.  During that three or five year plan period, the filer will need to pay a minimum of 10% of all their debt to most creditors, using whatever disposable income that person or couple has. Disposable income is income that is left over after paying all necessary and reasonable expenses, including things like child support, mortgage and auto loan payments.  Most Chapter 13 Trustees require that you make payments through a payroll deduction, unless there is some sort of hardship or danger of job loss or some other serious consequence.  A Chapter 13 bankruptcy takes longer and during the three or five year period, things may be financially tighter, but most people qualify for bankruptcy under this Chapter.

Chapter 13 also has many advantages over a Chapter 7. For those facing foreclosure or repossession, filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy can help save a person’s home or vehicle by allowing the individual (or married couple) to catch up on missed payments through the repayment plan.   Sometimes a Chapter 13 will allow a debtor to catch up on missed child support payments.  Credit bureau scores are not as severely affected compared to a Chapter 7.  Also, Chapter 13’s can be filed more frequently, unlike Chapter 7s which cannot be filed less than once every eight years.

Chapter 11

Chapter 11 bankruptcies are typically used by businesses, but some individuals and small business owners may file under Chapter 11 as well. A Chapter 11 allows businesses to restructure debts and to pay them back over time.  Chapter 11 bankruptcies are very useful for someone who does not qualify for a Chapter 13, although this type of bankruptcy is more complex than a Chapter 7 or 13.

Life after Bankruptcy

Whether it’s Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 you are thinking about, keep this in mind. If you want to file because you’ve had some sort of significant event in your life like an extended period of unemployment or lots of medical bills, bankruptcy is a very effective tool.  Bankruptcy may help you catch up or eliminate most of your debt and a great way to reorganize your financial life.

However, if you are experiencing financial hardship because you never learned how to manage money and you tend to spent beyond your means, filing for bankruptcy may not be very helpful. In other words, bankruptcy can get most folks where they want to go, but it won’t keep them financially stable without a little work.  Living within your financial means and tackling the reasons why you tend to spend beyond your means is critical for success.  Although one in every one hundred people may file for bankruptcy each year, only 8% of those people every file again.  This means that most folks figure it out.  They regroup and regain sound financial ground.  You can too.  It’s really quite simple.

Why Smart People File for Bankruptcy

Steve Rhode of the Huffington Post thinks that bankruptcy is not a moral decision, but rather an important strategy for dealing with financial difficulty and getting back on your feet rather quickly.  He says that people who file for bankruptcy are smart.  I agree.  Being honest and upfront, especially about difficult and challenging situations, is the most likely way to reach a positive outcome.

If you have other legal questions, especially if you are contemplating bankruptcy or dealing with collections or debt collection law suits, Attorney Ginger Kelly is now accepting clients in the Dudley, Webster, Sturbridge, Fiskdale, Southbridge, Saundersdale, Oxford, North Oxford, Charlton, Charlton Depot, Auburn, Leicester, Rochdale, Spencer, Brookfield, East Brookfield, West Brookfield, North Brookfield, Warren, Brimfield, Wales, Palmer and Holland.  We can explore whether or not bankruptcy is the easy way out for you.  Our office is a quiet and comfortable place to talk, and a free pot of coffee will be waiting for you when you arrive.

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ABOUT: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit our website, or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved

 

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Barefoot Drivers in Massachusetts

Barefoot drivers in Massachusetts

By Ginger B. Kelly, August 1, 2018

As most of you know already, I am a Facebook user. Click Here to see my Facebook page.  I also post on Twitter, Instagram and other things like, Linkedin and AVVO.com.  Because of my strong Social Media presence, it’s not unusual for people ask me interesting legal questions.

One of my dearest friends posed a very general question on Facebook regarding driving barefooted in Massachusetts.  He wanted to know whether or not it was legal to drive with no shoes or footwear, in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Although I am primarily a bankruptcy and consumer defense attorney, I sometimes handle a few criminal and civil cases, including traffic citations.  I told my friend that I would do a little quick research on this interesting general topic.

This is what I found…

I started with the Massachusetts laws, or statutes, regarding driving while impaired.  As most of you already know, driving while impaired means a lot of things, but it doesn’t mean driving without shoes.  Impaired driving has to do with defendants who ingest, smoke or take substances that “impair” their ability to drive.  In other words, don’t drink and drive or don’t drive while intoxicated or when taking drugs or substances, whether or not those substances are legally permissible.  If they cause you to drive unsafely, it’s illegal.  Although driving barefooted may be fun, it’s probably not exactly intoxicating.  Thereby, barefooted driving would not qualify as an offense or apply to the law, under the impaired driving statutes in Massachusetts.  Arguably, if driving without shoes induces an impaired driving intoxication, then for the sake of argument, there may be some remote chance there is a legal situation or offense.  I said remote.  If this happened, such a strange situation would be handled by a judge on a case by case basis.

Moving right along…

There are a similar set of statues in Massachusetts called the distracted driving statutes.  Distracting driving is similar to driving while impaired in that a driver can not allow certain things to interfere with safe driving, but these are different because they don’t involve substances that impair driving.  Under the distracted driving statutes, all drivers who drive in Massachusetts are prohibited from doing things that prevent them from keeping their “eyes on the road,” such as text messaging and cell phone use, using technology and other devices. One part of this law, for example, is that all drivers under the age of 18 are prohibited from all cell phone use.  These kinds of things are considered “distracted” driving but there is no mention of barefoot driving or driving without footwear.

For the sake of argument, if driving with no shoes is distracting to you and you can’t keep your eyes on the road, or perhaps the shoes or flip flops you just kicked off your feet are getting under your foot pedals, causing you to drive in an unsafe manner, this would be a matter that could be considered distracted driving.  However, this sort of barefoot driving case would be a matter that should be settled by a judge or jury at court.  I don’t suggest doing this.  But for sake of this research, there is nothing per se, in Massachusetts, that would prohibit one from driving without shoes, according to the impaired or distracted driving statutory laws. But there are other laws pertaining to driving.  Let’s take a look.

Taking a look at the new Safe Driving laws of Massachusetts, one can see that there are a lot of restrictions regarding mobile phones, devices and driving over the age of 75 and older.  However, I found nothing in the safe driving laws of Massachusetts regarding barefoot driving.  So there you have it!  Let’s move on to regulatory law.

I began my quick regulatory law research by taking a look at the Massachusetts Driver’s manual.  The Massachusetts Driver’s Manuel states, “In your vehicle, nothing should get in the way of your ability to see, react, or drive.”  In other words, you can not have distracting objects in your vehicle, like wearing both head phones, a television visible to the driver or anything that could get in the way of your feet, and use of the vehicle pedals, while driving.  Again, this sort of thing implies that it’s not permissible to simply kick off your shoes and let the shoes interfere with safe driving.  However, the RMV manual mentions nothing about driving without shoes.  So, RMV regulatory law isn’t a big help here, other than giving us a better idea of what it means to drive safely, not distracted and not intoxicated or under the influence of substances. Never the less, we still don’t really know whether or not there is anything in Massachusetts law that says it is not permissible to drive without shoes.

I ran a search on Mass.gov to see if I could find anything further in the regulations regarding driving barefoot.  I found something interesting regarding footwear guidelines in the UK, but I found nothing for  driving while barefoot in Massachusetts.

I also ran a case law search on my legal search engine.  I found nothing regarding case law in Massachusetts.  Since I could not find any recent case law regarding barefoot drivers in Massachusetts, it is safe to assume there is no law or precedent regarding barefoot driving in Massachusetts.  Therefore, it is highly probable that it is legal to drive without shoes, with only socks or barefoot in Massachusetts, provided that driving without shoes is safe and does not distract one’s driving ability to drive safely.

Drive safely with naked tootsies or just socks in Massachusetts. Just be careful and be sure that your naked foot driving is free from intoxication, distraction and that kicking off your shoes never gets in the way of driving safe.  Good luck!

If you have any comments or questions on this topic, or law in general, I invite you to post your comments, below.  It’s interesting to see what others have to say.

If you have other legal questions, especially if you are contemplating bankruptcy or dealing with collections or debt collection law suits, Attorney Ginger Kelly is now accepting clients in the Dudley, Webster, Sturbridge, Fiskdale, Southbridge, Saundersdale, Oxford, North Oxford, Charlton, Charlton Depot, Auburn, Leicester, Rochdale, Spencer, Brookfield, East Brookfield, West Brookfield, North Brookfield, Warren, Brimfield, Wales, Palmer and Holland.  We can explore whether or not bankruptcy is the easy way out for you.  Our office is a quiet and comfortable place to talk, and a free pot of coffee will be waiting for you when you arrive.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit our website, or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved

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Master Medical Debt Lawsuits in 10 Easy Steps

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Master Medical Debt Lawsuits in 10 Easy Steps

By Attorney Ginger Kelly, July 19, 2018

Being sued by a debt collector or service provider over medical debt is no picnic. If you can’t afford to pay the initial debt, it is likely that you still can’t pay it. Going to court is also very stressful, time consuming and costs you time off from work and other more important things. These are things we all worry about.

Although you may be tempted to ignore a medical debt law suit you know you can’t pay, it is always best to show up. If you ignore the law suit, the other side wins, automatically by default.  A default Judgment will haunt you and your credit report for twenty years in Massachusetts.

What happens when you show up for court?  Below are 10 steps that you can take if you are facing a medical debt lawsuit.

  1. Find out where the debt comes from

You cannot properly talk about your lawsuit until you fully understand why you are being sued. Past bills should tell you something about the debt.  Find a date of service and, perhaps, an itemized list of what services were given to you that you are being charged for.

  1. Answer the lawsuit

In most medical debt and other consumer debt cases, people don’t have an attorney. Hiring an attorney is a wise move, so seek a free first consultation with a lawyer before you hire them. Sometimes, a lawyer can help you to represent yourself.

Many times, when people meet certain income guidelines, they can apply for free legal aid. Worcester Community Legal Aid services is an example of one of many nonprofit public service centers, helping clients with free and reduced fee legal services for debt collection law suits. Many times, a limited service lawyer will be at the courthouse to help clients. Call and find out when this free service is available.

  1. Prepare for court

The next step to take is to prepare to answer your lawsuit. In Massachusetts a defendant has twenty days from the date of notice to answer a small claims or civil suit. Answering a law suit involves filling out paperwork at the court, which will involve answering every paragraph and including all your legal defenses along with a certificate of service saying that you mailed a copy to the other side. Then, you have to mail the paperwork to the other side who is suing you.  Next, show up at the initial court date. After you answer the suit, the court will set a date for the discovery part of the trial. It is very helpful to find a lawyer who can advise you regarding this process.

It’s important to make this initial court date.  Traditionally, in Massachusetts, this is called a discovery or pre-trial conference where you have time to talk to the other side and see if you can make a deal.  It’s helpful to ask for a payment plan and a reduction of the debt.  At this stage of the game, it is unlikely that the judge will grant you a continuance that would move the court date further out. It’s probably best not to ask unless you live out of the jurisdiction and you would like to get counsel to move the suit to a better place where you can defend.

At the discovery part of your lawsuit, you will have to file more paperwork about your finances and will need to sit and wait to talk to someone. This is not the time to present evidence that you are not liable for the debt. If you are not liable, you can present this evidence at hearing. This means, you will need to show up another time for hearing.

  1. Know about wage garnishment

If at hearing, you are found liable for the debt, or if you failed to answer the lawsuit and the judge rules against you, the court may issue a judgment order and an execution, giving the lender or collection agency the ability to garnish your wages. Social security benefits, disability insurance payments, unemployment, VA benefits and other things, like public assistance and child support are excluded from garnishment.  If you have any of these forms of income, it’s wise to set up a different bank account where those funds are deposited and keep all garnishable wages in another separate account. Do not mix these funds with other things like regular wages.

By federal law, the lender or collection agency can’t take more than 75% of your income. Based on Massachusetts law, which is more protective, creditors can take only 15% before taxes or other deductions, or they can take your disposable income less 50 times the greater of the federal or Massachusetts minimum wage. Effective January 1, 2017, the Massachusetts minimum wage is $11 per hour.  This means that any amount exceeding $550 per week can be garnished from your wages, in Massachusetts.

Also, under Massachusetts law, some medical institutions can take your tax return refund to pay past due bills.  It’s better to take care of them before your tax refund is levied.

  1. Were you served properly?

Sometimes wages are garnished before the plaintiff is even aware that there’s a lawsuit against them. This happens most commonly when you’re improperly served. Examples of using “improperly served” as a legal defense include papers being only mailed to you and not delivered in person, papers being left at an incorrect residence, or papers being mailed to an old address. Being “improperly served” does not mean that the papers were left with a family member or friend at your residence and they forgot to tell you about it. If that happened, you’re still on the hook.

If you have been improperly served, or if you find out that the court mistakenly started garnishing wages because you have the same name as an actual plaintiff, you should contact a lawyer immediately.  Find out what possible resources there may be for you in your situation.

  1. Get low-cost or free help from financial assistance programs

Under the Affordable Care Act, these hospitals must provide some type of financial assistance program to low-income patients. Even if you aren’t from a low-income household, you should apply, as some hospitals extend their programs far beyond the poverty line. Many hospitals also extend this program to insured patients.

  1. Discriminatory pricing

If you are being sued in court and are uninsured, discriminatory pricing can serve as a defense. If you qualify for the hospital’s financial assistance program, the hospital must legally reduce your bill to the amount generally billed to insured patients.

  1. Look out for balance billing

Balance billing happens when your hospital or medical provider bills you instead of or in addition to Medicaid or Medicare. It’s a forbidden practice, and you are not responsible for any amounts due when this happens.

You may be able to identity balance billing if you receive an “Explanation of Benefits” from your insurer that states the amount they covered and the amount you still owe. If this does not match the bill your medical provider sent you, there is a cause for concern. Additionally, if the bill you receive does not show any payment from your insurance when you are, in fact, on Medicaid or Medicare, it may be a sign that you are a victim of balance billing.

  1. Stop lawsuits before they start

If something about your bill doesn’t look quite right, there are ways to reduce it to its fair amount. Debt collectors, hospitals, and other medical providers don’t want to take you to court. It costs them money, and the odds of them actually getting a full payment at that point are very low. They are almost always willing to work with you before issuing a lawsuit. Negotiate. Apply for financial assistance. Set up a no interest payment plan directly with your health care provider.  Keeping the lines of communication open is the best way to avoid costly litigation and compounded interest and fees.

If you didn’t have insurance at the time of service, a good idea is to contact the doctor or debt collection agency and try to negotiate the bill down to Medicaid/Medicare prices.  This should save you at least one to two thirds the initial cost.  If a provider doesn’t want to negotiated, your attorney can use, “discriminatory pricing: as a legal defense in court.

  1. Weigh bankruptcy

There may come a point in the process to consider bankruptcy as an option.  Filing for bankruptcy may alleviate the medical debt and all your other bills. However, as a cautionary measure, bankruptcy is not a decision to take lightly.  A chapter 7 will remain on your credit reports for up to 8 years and make it difficult to qualify for new credit with a low interest rate.

There are two types of bankruptcy: Chapter 7 and Chapter 13.  Chapter 7 is a form of liquidation.  If you qualify, a Chapter 7 bankruptcy requires you to sell off all of your non-exempt assets to settle what you can of your debt obligations. If you don’t have any non-exempt assets, this part probably doesn’t matter much. What does matter is that most of your debt, if not all, will disappear after you receive your discharge.

A chapter 13 Bankruptcy is a type of reorganization of your debts.  In a Chapter 13, you do not have to sell off any assets, but the debt won’t disappear either.  Instead, you will pay your debt from your disposable income via a 3-5 year payment plan. After the 3 or 5 year plan is over, the rest of any qualifying debt you could not pay out of your payment plan is discharged.

Filing for bankruptcy makes sense if the court has already issued an order to garnish your wages.  However, at any other point in your situation, it makes good sense to try to negotiate and set up a payment plan with the medical service provider or debt collection agency directly.

A debt collection agencies last resort is wage garnishment, but it doesn’t have to come down to this. By knowing your rights and negotiating, effectively, rather than damaging your credit scores, you may have a good chance to work through a win-win situation.

If you are contemplating bankruptcy, and have some questions about wage garnishment or medical debt, Attorney Ginger Kelly is now accepting clients in the Dudley, Webster, Sturbridge, Fiskdale, Southbridge, Saundersdale, Oxford, Charlton, Auburn, Leicester, Spencer, Brookfield, East Brookfield, West Brookfield, Warren, Brimfield, Wales, Palmer and Holland.  We can explore whether or not bankruptcy is the easy way out or not.  Our office is a quiet and comfortable place to talk and a free pot of coffee will be waiting for you when you arrive.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit, http://www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Bankruptcy, Chapter 7, Choosing a lawyer, Civil, civil law, Collection, credit card debt, Debt, Debt Collection, Deficiency, Deficiency Debt, Empowerment, Filing, Financial, Hiring Counsel, Judgements, Law, Lawsuits, Legal, Massachusetts, Massachusetts law, Medical Debt, payment, practical stuff, Rhode Island, Uncategorized, Wage Garnishment

Lien Removal via bankruptcy

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Lien Removal via Bankruptcy

By Ginger B. Kelly, Esq. May 23, 2018

Judgment liens on residential real estate or automobile titles can become a big problem for owners who want to sell or refinance. A lien is a type of instrument that secures a debt, similar to the way a mortgage secures a loan or note or a lien on a title can secure an automobile loan. Liens can be created for a number of reasons, like  to pay a judgment on a credit card debt, unpaid taxes, mechanic’s liens for unpaid services or water or sewer charges or any judgment in a lawsuit to pay a debt of any kind, even unpaid car loans or leases.

In Massachusetts, a lien from a judgment in a lawsuit is called an execution. The execution secures the amount that was awarded to the plaintiff and enforces the judgment awarded.  For example, credit card companies like Discover, Synchrony, Citi Bank or Bank of America, debt buyers like Midland Funding, and auto loan companies, like Wells Fargo and Ford Motor Credit, commonly record executions after receiving a judgment. Some companies even record liens before a judgment, if there is reason to believe the property will be sold or encumbered in any way.

There are only a few ways that a defendant may remove an execution, in Massachusetts. One way is if the debtor pays the creditor/plaintiff the amount owed on the execution. Then the creditor may ask the court to release the execution or lien. The other way is to pay the creditor a lesser amount owed, also known as a “settlement.” If the creditor agrees to a lesser amount, the creditor or the debtor can ask the court to remove the execution after the debt is satisfied by payment. Another option is if the judgment secured by the lien is vacated (i.e. thrown out). Without the underlying judgment, the execution can be released.  The only problem with this is that even if the execution is released, the debt won’t necessarily go away. The creditor might be able to re-file the lawsuit. A third option is to have the lien avoided in a bankruptcy.

When a homeowner files for bankruptcy in Massachusetts, he or she can claim a homestead exemption that protects between $125,000 and $500,000 in equity in their personal residence. The Bankruptcy Code allows filers to remove liens, also known as “avoiding” liens, like executions that impair this exemption. Once avoided, the lien can be cleared from the title by recording or registering orders from the bankruptcy court at the registry of deeds.

At the Law Offices of Ginger B. Kelly, we often obtain orders to clear liens from many of our client’s real estate, automobile titles and other personal property.  By obtaining and recording or registering orders from the bankruptcy court, we help many of our clients refinance or sell their homes and other property without problems stemming from a lien. If you have a lien that poses a problem for your property, talk to us (free of charge) and we will evaluate your options.

The Law Offices of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting clients in the Sturbridge, Southbridge, Dudley, Webster, Oxford, Charlton, Auburn, Spencer, Brookfield, Warren and all of the Worcester County Area. We can explore whether or not bankruptcy is the easy way out or not.  We have a comfortable place to talk and a fresh cup coffee waiting for you.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, http://www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

 

 

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With No Money, How Do I Pay My Attorney to File My Bankruptcy?

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How do I Pay My Attorney for My Bankruptcy?

By, Ginger Kelly, Esq.  April 10, 2018

The other day, a personal friend asked me (for a friend), whether or not they should she use their tax return tax refund to pay down their credit card bills or to replace the old and leaking roof on their home.  Their roof needed repairing badly.  Their credit card debt was very old and the payments were more than they could afford.  Even though I can’t make that final decision for this friend’s friend (or any of my clients), I can advise most folks of their legal options.  When people need to make a choice between a roof over their head or paying credit card bills, one good option available to most everyone is a fresh start.

In many or most situations, bankruptcy can give an individual or a couple, the fresh start they need. If you are in a position where you need to make important decisions like what to pay and what not to pay, like a roof on your home or to repair the vehicle you need to get to work, talk to a good bankruptcy attorney.  Most give free first consultations, like our office. Bankruptcy might be an option for you, or maybe not.  A person hasn’t lost but an hour of their time discussing their options with a good attorney.  Talking to a professional about options for taking care of debt, sometimes gives the clarity you need to make the right decisions for your future.

A client visited me the other day to discuss her situation. Apparently, she had debt exceeding any amount she could pay.  It wasn’t much debt, but it was a lot for her and that is important. Her earnings were barely more than the poverty level.  So while we had a nice hot cup of coffee, we talked about all of her options.  It was a nice pleasant, casual conversation.  I discovered that my client earned too much money to qualify for a free bankruptcy, through legal aid. She was sad and asked me what can be done.

Because her bankruptcy was not complex, I agreed to lower my fee. I gave her my best  fee option. Still, she was worried. Where would she find the money to pay the attorney fee? I asked her if she was getting a tax refund. She said yes, but it wasn’t enough. She was sickened with the idea of paying creditors all of her disposable income for years to come.

All of a sudden, she had an idea. She said, rather than trying to negotiate and pay down her credit card debt, using all of her disposable income, she said she could ask her uncle for the money. She said that she was thinking of asking him for a gift to help her pay down her loans anyway. Why not ask him for the same gift to pay her attorney’s fees?  Good idea! Sometimes asking relatives to help is a better option than worrying about how to pay overwhelming debt. I’ve had several clients in this kind of situation.

Once, a couple was in the same situation. The wife lost her job due to illness and then one thing led to another. They became deeply indebted, mostly to unsecured creditors (credit card companies). The best option for them was to file for bankruptcy. We talked a little bit and I gave them my best rate.  They were thankful, but without the extra cash, they didn’t know how to pay the legal fees. This was a problem for them.  However, determination overcomes lots of obstacles.

This couple scraped and saved and paid a little along. One spouse sold a baseball card collection and some tools.  The other sold some furniture they no longer needed. They used Craigslist and Facebook Yard Sale to sell a few more things.  They sent checks, one by one, to our office. Sometimes the check was small, sometimes large. We placed all of these funds into our client’s trust account, on hold for them until they finished paying. It didn’t take long. Within about four months, this couple paid all their fees, including the filing fee. This couple couldn’t have been happier.  I was so happy to help them in this way.

Once a person is determined to make a bad situation better, magic happens. There are more options for paying lawyer’s fees than these. Options are only limited by a person’s motivation, determination and imagination. Typically, I ask clients whether or not they have a tax refund coming to them.  This is a very good option for covering fees and things.  Then, I suggest asking friends or relatives for a gift.  At our office we have many ways of making your bankruptcy affordable, sometimes even free or at a reduced rate. Ask us how and perhaps we can help to make your fresh start,more affordable.  It may be easier than you think.

The Law Offices of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting clients in the Sturbridge, Southbridge, Dudley, Webster, Oxford, Charlton, Auburn, Spencer, Brookfield, Warren and all of the Worcester County Area. We can explore whether or not bankruptcy is the easy way out or not.  We have a comfortable place to talk and a free pot of coffee waiting for you.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit, http://www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

 

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Filed under About Attorney Kelly, Bankruptcy, Chapter 7, Choosing a lawyer, Collection, credit card debt, Debt, Deficiency, Deficiency Debt, Filing, Financial, Foreclosure, Hiring Counsel, Judgements, Law, Lawsuits, Legal, Legal Rights, Liens, Massachusetts, Massachusetts law, Mortgages, payment, practical stuff, Rhode Island, Spouse, Student Loan Debt, tax refund, tax return, Uncategorized

Property Transferring No No’s, Before Filing Bankruptcy

Money in an envelope

Property Transferring No No’s, Before Filing Bankruptcy

by Attorney Ginger B. Kelly, February 23, 2018

There are a few types of transfers that will definitely not help if you want to file for bankruptcy to get a fresh start. One of those is types of transfers is called a prepetition transfer or (in other words) a fraudulent or irregular transfer.

Essentially, a prepetition transfer is a transfer of property (money or other things, including real estate) given to a person or creditor within 90 days from the date you file your petition. A prepetition transfer may also be a transfer of any property (money or other things, including real estate) to any insider, like a business partner, family or friend, within one year of your bankruptcy filing. Prepetition transfers are one of the biggest reasons why it is important to consult with a qualified, experienced, bankruptcy attorney, before you file. The prepetition transfer follows something called the 90 day rule.

Basically, the 90 day rule relates to debts that a debtor has paid, while insolvent, within the past 90 days of filing their bankruptcy petition and is set forth in section 547(b) of the Bankruptcy Code. The 90 day rule generally means that the US bankruptcy trustee has permission to avoid, (which means unwind or undo), any transfer made to a creditor or an insider if the transfer had an aggregate value of $600 or more provided that the transfer was made within 90 days from the date of the bankruptcy filing, and for any transfers made up to one year, if the person who received the transfer was an insider.

Here are a couple of examples of a fraudulent or irregular transfer:

Jane wanted to settle a debt before filing. She saved around $3,000 and was successful in negotiating with creditors to pay off one of her credit cards. Jane negotiated a settlement with blue credit company for $700 on October 30, 2017. She negotiated another settlement and paid red credit company $1,000 on November 1, 2017. After Jane negotiated successfully, with blue and red credit companies, she tried to negotiate with orange and green credit companies. She was unsuccessful. So Jane filed her bankruptcy without an attorney. Since she paid $700 to blue and $1,000 to red, her US Trustee avoided these transfers to get the money back. The trustee will allow all of Jane’s creditors to receive an equal share of the $1700 and prevent one particular creditor from benefiting more than the others. This is just one example. There are more.

The second section of the 90 day rule allows bankruptcy trustee to avoid any transfers of property made to any creditor that is also an insider (i.e., business partner, relative or friend) made between 90 days and one year of your bankruptcy filing date and exceeds and aggregate value of $600 or more.

In the next example, Steven bought his daughter Karen, a $15,000 car for graduating college. Steven paid $5,000 from funds he kept in his savings account and made the remainder of the purchase from a $10,000 line of credit on his credit card. On June 30, 2017, Steven transferred the title, over to his daughter.  In September of 2017, Steven lost his job. He was no longer able to make the remainder of Karen’s car payments. After four months without a job, Steven’s debt was piling up. So, in January 2018, Steven decided that he wanted to file chapter 7 bankruptcy to get a fresh financial start. If Steven were to file for bankruptcy before June 30, of 2018, there may be a good chance that the trustee would be able to avoid the car title transfer he made to his daughter, Karen. This would put the vehicle Steven just purchased for his daughter at risk. If Steven’s bankruptcy attorney knew of this transfer, the attorney would have warned Steven of the issues involving the purchase of Karen’s car prior to filing.

The fraudulent transfer rule involves all property, not just cash, and also applies to both chapters 7 and 13 bankruptcies. There are only a few exceptions. One, for example, is the exception for transfers made in the ordinary course of business, in other words, the property was sold to another (not an insider) for a fair and accurate value. But even so, bankruptcy can get complicated and for most folks, an attorney is usually needed to help out. Some people can’t imagine how to pay for a bankruptcy when they have no money. I’ll talk about that more, in my next article.

For now, if you’d like to set up an appointment to talk about affordability and your available options, call me. We can talk, face-to-face, and explore your options over a nice cup of coffee or tea.

The other day, a new client couple asked whether or not they should she use their tax return tax refund to pay down their credit card bills or use their tax refund to replace the roof on their home. Their roof needed repairing badly. Their credit card debt was very old. I cannot make that final decision for any of my clients, but I can advise them of their options. If you are in a position where you need to make important decisions like paying your credit card bills or paying for something extremely important, like a roof on your home, it may be a great idea to talk to a good attorney. Most give free first consultations.

If you are contemplating bankruptcy, and have some questions about a transfer you may have made or the 90 day rule, The Law Offices of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting clients in the Sturbridge, Southbridge, Dudley, Webster, Oxford, Charlton, Auburn, Spencer, Brookfield, Warren and all of the Worcester County Area. We can explore whether or not bankruptcy is the easy way out or not.  We have a comfortable place to talk and a free pot of coffee waiting for you.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit, http://www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Bankruptcy, Chapter 7, Choosing a lawyer, Collection, credit card debt, Debt, Debt Collection, Deficiency, Empowerment, Filing, Financial, Judgements, Law, Lawsuits, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, tax refund, tax return, Uncategorized

Bankruptcy Without My Spouse

Spouses

By Attorney Ginger Kelly, January 24, 2018

Bankruptcy is a great way to get a fresh start, but how will it affect your spouse if you want to file individually? Attorney Kelly investigates a few common questions about dealing with a bankruptcy when a spouse might be involved.

Am I required to file bankruptcy with my spouse?

The short answer to this question is no. If only one partner in a marriage owes debt, then only that partner should file for bankruptcy. Debts where spouses are joint and severally liable for payment will remain with the spouse who has not filed for bankruptcy. The exception is in states that follow community property law.  In community property states, single spouse bankruptcy for joint debts may in some situations be advantageous.

What happens to my credit or property if my spouse files bankruptcy?

As a general rule, one spouse filing for bankruptcy will not affect the other spouse’s credit rating or financial situation. Because a debt is a contract between a debtor and a creditor, each debtor must sign the contract to be liable for payment. The spouse not signing the contract would not be liable for the debt.  This is why the bankruptcy of one spouse doesn’t affect the other spouse or cause the other spouse to become bankrupt too.

What happens to joint debts when one spouse files for bankruptcy as an individual?

Under a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, when one spouse’s debts are discharged, or wiped clean, the creditor can go after the other spouse jointly responsible for the debt.  But, in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, joint debtor spouses have a major advantage.  When the debtor spouse plans to re-pay his or her debts, over the time of the 3 or 5 year plan, the creditor will generally not bother the other spouse, as long as bankruptcy plan payments are deposited on time.

What are the exceptions?

There are some notable exceptions to co-debtor spouses when only one is filing for bankruptcy. For example, there is a possibility that the bankruptcy of one’s spouse may show up on the other’s credit report, but only if joint debt is involved.  If joint debt is involved, your bankruptcy may affect your spouse’s credit scores.  But not paying the debt will also affect your spouse’s credit scores. Another issue might involve applying for a joint loan in the future.  The bankruptcy of one spouse will affect the creditworthiness of both spouses applying for a loan jointly, or together.

Another exception deals with jointly held property. In a regular bankruptcy, the US Trustee may take non-exempt property and sell it to use it to pay creditors.  Even jointly held property can be taken if not exempted.  This is of vital importance in community property states, states where both spouses in a marriage own and are responsible for all the debt and property acquired during the marriage. The community property states are Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington and Wisconsin. Massachusetts and Rhode Island are not community property states but rather, common law property states.

In common law property states, like Massachusetts and Rhode Island, your individual assets and your interest in any property you own jointly with your spouse (typically half unless otherwise noted) are considered part of your bankruptcy estate. In other words, they split the baby, so to speak. But your spouse’s half or portion is protected, generally. The property your spouse owns in his or her name alone is normally not at risk.

However, it is important to know that in Chapter 7 bankruptcy, the appointed US Trustee may be able to sell the entire jointly owned asset if you can’t exempt the value of your interest, provided that the property can’t be divided. If the trustee sells the property, he or she will pay your spouse the value of her interest and use your portion of the nonexempt proceeds to pay back your creditors. This is what I mean by “split the baby.” Keep this in mind.

What if my spouse gets calls and letters from my collection agencies?

Sometimes collection agencies will pursue both spouses even though only one spouse owes debt. If you feel that the calls and letters asking for payment are only meant for your spouse you can do something at this point. First, ask the collector to prove the debt by requesting proof of responsibility for those debts.  If the debt is solely to your spouse’s name, you can ask the collectors to stop calling you or sending you letters, but you must do this in writing (via letter).  If your spouse has already filed for bankruptcy, the collection agency can be stopped if his/her attorney would motion the court and ask to court to enforce the automatic stay.

Can I file for bankruptcy without my spouse knowing?

Yikes! Yes you can, but no don’t do it. Theoretically and in a legal sense, yes, you can file without your spouse knowing. However, because a Chapter 7 uses household income as part of the Means Test, you will need to report your spouse’s income. Also, in some extreme cases, some bankruptcy courts use income garnishment for debt repayment. Since you don’t want your spouse discovering their paychecks have been garnished, after the fact, it’s a really good idea to let them know from the beginning. Hiding bankruptcy is just a temporary solution, at best, and isn’t a good idea. Besides, secrets like this may wreak havoc on a marriage.

When do I need an attorney to file?

If you are considering bankruptcy, it always best to consult with a lawyer. A bankruptcy attorney will advise you to many things critical to your bankruptcy success. For example, fraudulent transfers come to mind.

Just the other day, while waiting for my client’s meeting of the creditors, I couldn’t help but to notice a pro-se debtor speak to the US Trustee at a subsequent meeting.  It’s an open floor.  Everyone can hear what’s going on.  This poor young man did not realize that he made a fraudulent transfer by giving a sum of cash money to his father within a certain period of time before he filed.  Not only can the US Trustee unwind transfers, quite often a discharge in matters like this are not permissible.  I felt sorry for that debtor.  He worked so hard to get to this point on his own, only to be met with a very unsettling outcome.  This is why most debtors need a good bankruptcy attorney.

A bankruptcy attorney will advise you as to whether bankruptcy is your best course of action, based on your situation. Also, your attorney can advise you as to whether or not your spouse will be affected if you file or whether or not they should file with you.

Filing for bankruptcy is a great way to get a fresh start, but it may affect your spouse if they aren’t filing with you. Find out more about joint debt, keeping your spouse’s property and more by contacting a skilled bankruptcy attorney in your local area.

The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is a boutique type law firm located in central Massachusetts. We are not Big Law.  We only handle a small number of clients at one time.  Each client gets personal attention and care.  Each client gets hours and hours of time devoted to their particular case. Our office is in an easy to find location in Charlton. This means you don’t have to drive to the big city of Worcester or Boston and pay for parking. We not only offer free parking, but free coffee in a calm and peaceful place. Your discussion with our senior attorney is very confidential. Your first consultations will last about an hour in a stress-free, homey type atmosphere.

As one client put it, “This is like an old fashioned law office, very comfortable.”

Book your appointment now to explore your best options for this New Year.  We’ll have a nice pot of coffee waiting for you when you visit.

Also, keep in mind that it’s tax return season. Many people use their tax refunds to help pay for their bankruptcy.  There is no better time than now (tax refund season) to talk for free and find out more about ways you might be able to get the bankruptcy that you need now.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit, http://www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Bankruptcy, Chapter 7, Collection, credit card debt, Debt, Debt Collection, Filing, Financial, Financial Planning, Joint Property, Law, Massachusetts, Mortgages, Spouse, tax refund, tax return, Uncategorized

What to do when your car isn’t worth the loan payments

Auto loan and credit card debt

By Attorney Ginger Kelly, December 15, 2017

I’m seeing it over and over again with folks in our Central Massachusetts area.  Car loans are so expensive and cars lose their value so quickly, it is causing harm to consumers.  As soon as the loan papers are signed, folks are strapped to payments they can’t afford.  It’s a shame and it makes me mad, the same kind of mad I get when I see what payday lenders can do to hard working families.

One person I know (I won’t mention her name), who earns less than $1200 per month in Social Security Disability Income went to a dealer to get a car loan on a new car.  She pays over seven hundred dollars a month for rent, yet the dealer down the street gave her a car loan.  Her car loan payments were over $400 per month.  What’s going on here?  This is robbery, in my opinion.

Another client I had a long time ago, purchased a new car for well over twenty two thousand dollars.  Less than a year later, she lost her job.  She could no longer afford her monthly car payments.  She had to do something so she tried to negotiate a modification of her loan.  Without her good paying job, the lender said no.  To keep her home, she lost her car and surrendered it moments before it was repossessed.  Then, the dealer auctioned the car to pay the loan.  The car brought in only a few thousand dollars at auction.  The outstanding balance she owed to her lender was well over twelve thousand dollars.  How does a brand new car loose over ten thousand dollars in value in less than a year?  The car had very little miles and was in almost perfect condition.  I don’t understand it.  This client was compelled to file a Chapter 7 to keep a lien from being placed on her home.  This is how it goes.  It’s sad but true.

Another couple purchased a vehicle in 2011.  The vehicle cost was over twenty thousand dollars.  They successfully made payments for over four years. Then, the wife got sick and couldn’t work.  This caused the couple to lose over half of their income.  They decided to downsize and only drive one car to save money.  They surrendered the car to the lender.  The lender, in turn, sold the car and then charged this couple with a fifteen thousand dollar deficiency on the loan.  This amazing couple, going through some very difficult medical issues, could not pay the deficiency.  They were barely making their mortgage payments. Eventually, the lender took them to court. The lender got a judgment lien against the only asset they had, their home. The couple was devastated. This is why they came to me for help.

My husband was talking to a colleague at work, just today, who asked him why he drives a used car. My husband replied, “Why would I want a new car that’s 50% discounted as soon as I drive it home and if something happens to me and I can’t pay for it, the car gets repossessed and I won’t be able to pay the amount the lender will charge me after the car is surrendered.” He added, “My wife deals with this all the time. She sees people suffering in this type of situation. Why would I put my own finances in jeopardy just to drive a fancy new car?”  My husband said it bluntly and truthfully.

Frankly, I’m baffled at the inflated prices of vehicles these days. I’m astonished at the shady things that seem to be happening to consumers who need to drive to work and school.  What is going on in the lending and auto industry?  Who doesn’t need a car these days?  Maybe this is part of the problem. Consumers need reliable cars, so they do whatever they think is best to get one.  But there is hope.

Several of my clients have had to think about debt consolidation or even try this until they consulted with me and discussed the differences between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy and how this works.

Basically, a Chapter 7 is a total liquidation of all of your debts and a way to get a fresh start for most debt, but a person has to qualify first.  A Chapter 13 is a way to manage your debts by way of a three or five year payment plan.  In a Chapter 13, a debtor pays into this plan and then, after the end of the three or five years, comes out with a fresh start.  Bankruptcy is not for everyone, but it may be the only way to get rid of these not only annoying, but quite often unconscionable auto loan deficiencies.  For some people it’s the only way to stop creditors from placing liens on things like other cars and homes after they had to surrender their car or have it repossessed for one reason or another.

Bankruptcy, for some, is an option worth exploring.  Most Bankruptcy cases will cost anywhere from zero dollars (for qualifying pro bono cases) up to four or five thousand dollars, for some Chapter 13 cases and anywhere in between.  Attorneys cannot tell a client how much a bankruptcy case will cost until they have the opportunity to evaluate the work involved, the type of Bankruptcy needed, the complication of assets and debt and other factors.  But the good thing is, most bankruptcy attorneys offer a free first consultation for most clients.  If they don’t, I suggest that you think about visiting a bankruptcy attorney who does.

The next question my clients ask, I’ll touch briefly upon.  How does someone pay for a Bankruptcy if they don’t have any money?  Well, it’s not easy but it’s do-able.  Some clients sell collections or other things to find the money.  Most clients use tax return refunds to pay for their new start in life.  This is a very good option, indeed.  Still others borrow the money from friends or relatives (I do not suggest that you do this, however, sometimes it’s done anyway).  They ask relatives or friends to help out with a gift.  Christmas temp jobs are wonderful for helping out in a pinch.  Most of the time, where there is a will there is a way.  People find ways to pay for their bankruptcy and are happy to do so.

Tax season is right around the corner.  If you are thinking about whether or not to fix the roof of your home or pay your credit card debt, you might want to consult with a bankruptcy attorney.  If your car payments are too much of a burden for you and you are thinking of surrendering your car, you might want to consult with a bankruptcy attorney.  These are the real issues to consider in this coming tax filing season. Your next tax refund may be the way you too can enjoy a new lease on life and not to be bothered by the heavy burden of bills you cannot pay.

The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is a boutique type law firm.  We are not Big Law.  We only handle a small number of clients at one time.  Each client gets personal attention and care.  Each client gets hours and hours of time devoted to their particular case. Our office is in an easy to find location in Charlton. This means you don’t have to drive to the big city of Worcester or Boston and pay for parking. We not only offer free parking, but free coffee in a calm and peaceful place. Your discussion with our senior attorney is very confidential. Your first consultations will last about an hour in a stress-free, homey type atmosphere.

If you want to try a lawyer who is different, a new type of lawyer, Attorney Kelly is the one. Attorney Kelly is a lawyer who is interested in cultivating a more peaceful, kind and gentler approach to law. Her practice is unique. Her zealous advocacy is tempered by her high ethical standards. Her love for people provides the foundation for her attentive personal service. As one client put it, “This is like an old fashioned law office, very comfortable.”

Book your appointment now and explore your best options for the New Year.  We’ll have a nice pot of coffee waiting for you when you visit.

Good luck and have the Happiest of Holidays!

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit, http://www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.
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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We can not stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2017 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Auto Loans, Bankruptcy, Chapter 7, Choosing a lawyer, Collection, credit card debt, Debt, Debt Collection, Deficiency, Hiring Counsel, Judgements, Law, Lawsuits, Legal, Liens, Massachusetts, practical stuff, Repossession, Rhode Island, tax refund, tax return, Uncategorized

Defending Debt Collections in Court: 6 Amazing Ways to Score Big Time

Boxing gloves business woman angry
Defending Debt Collections in Court: 6 Amazing Ways to Score Big Time

By Attorney Ginger Kelly
October 5, 2017

The New York Times ran a story in 2012 about the outpouring of credit card debt lawsuits being filed. They compared this widespread outbreak to the “robo-signing” fiasco which plagued the mortgage industry in years past. Now it seems the debt collection industry has taken up “robo-lawsuits” and are filing thousands of lawsuits a day all across America, including Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Lawsuits are being filed with the expectation that 99% of all defendants will not answer. In 2017, this is still a big problem.

Lots of people people being taken to court by debt collectors and lenders, many of them don’t owe a dime.  This is the new trend, plaguing thousands upon thousands of consumers in America today.

The biggest problem with these debt collection lawsuits is that about 90% of them are flawed. Debt collectors cannot prove that they are the ones owed the money.  They cannot prove how much money is owed, if any.  This is where consumers must take charge. Knowledge is power. Knowing things the debt collectors wish you didn’t know will often place you in the driver’s seat when it comes to Debt Collection law suits.

1. Start at the Beginning, Answer the Lawsuit.

If a debt collector files a lawsuit against you to collect a debt, you will receive a summons (typically in the mail). Many people ignore these types of summons, because they look like ordinary mail. Within the summons is a complaint. The complaint has a date to respond and instructions on how to file an answer.  Take note of the instructions and, if you like, look for a form to respond to the complaint.  In Massachusetts, Mass.gov has forms that can help you in small claims or in district court.  These forms can be easily filled out. You must remember to respond to the lawsuit, either personally or through your lawyer, by the date specified in the court papers. This will preserve your rights in court. It’s simple and doing maintains your right to challenge the debt in court.

Even if you owe this debt, a two-sentence response denying liability to the lawsuit filed in court will suffice. When you do this, chances are your law suit will likely lead to a negotiated settlement. This will save you money in the long run, because most of the time the debt amount is inaccurate. The number one mistake people make when they are sued is failing to respond to the notice in the complaint.

In your answer, you can simply Admit, Deny or express Lack of Knowledge to each statement made by the plaintiff debt collector. Of course you don’t admit to any statement unless you know it’s 100% true, so be honest. Don’t guess. If you don’t know whether or not, for example, the account number listed is your credit card number, or the debt amount is actually the amount of money owed, deny the claim. The same is true for all the allegations. If you do not understand what the plaintiff is saying, you should say, Lack of Knowledge. Lack of Knowledge simply means you don’t know whether that statement is true or not. Then, take your answer to the clerk of court and file it. Mail a copy to the other side. Ask the clerk the proper procedure for making copies and mailing.  Better yet, don’t bother taking chances or taking the day off from work to file papers with the clerk, talk to your lawyer and bring in the big guns to fight this for you. Pay your attorney to hassle with the paperwork.

Even if you don’t have an attorney, don’t be shy or embarrassed. Filing an answer doesn’t mean you want to avoid paying your debts. It only means you are a smart consumer. It means that you want the debt collector to do his job and prove their allegations against you. In any business transaction, it is always best to be sure that you actually owe the correct amount before paying it. The same applies to debt collection law suits. This is why you file a simple answer.

2. Find Out Who, Exactly, Owns the Right to Take You to Court

The collection agency must prove they have the right to collect this debt, if you ask them. This is their job. Make them work. All collection agencies have a duty to provide good evidence of a transfer of the signed credit card agreement, but only if you ask. If you don’t ask, they have no duty. So, if you ask and the other side does not produce paperwork, you you don’t understand it, ask the magistrate or the judge to dismiss the case.  When the plaintiff does not have the “chain of custody” paperwork giving them the right to collect this debt from you, they lose.

It’s rather enjoyable when a judge or magistrate takes a good look at the chain of custody paperwork many debt collectors provide. Some of them shake their head. Then, they dismiss the case. It’s that simple.

Mass Legal Help is a great website that gives examples of how to answer and challenge a debt collections law suit in a simple and complete manner.

3. Make the Debt Collector Prove the Amount Owed, Why Not?

This is a good one. In most debt collection law suits, there are so many charges upon charges, and fees no one understands, it’s not funny. Make the debt collection agency prove the amount owed by simply asking them to provide the original signed agreement and a balance on the account from zero to the present. If they can’t prove what you owe, the judge will not be able to make a ruling and will dismiss the case.  If they hand you a huge stack of paper, don’t feel threatened.  Either ask for them to show you what the papers mean, or ask for a continuance so you can examine the documents.

I talk a little bit more about this in my article, Debt Collection and 7 Deadly Sins. Take a quick look at point 3. Greed. This may help you.

4. Use the Statute of Limitations, Like a Boss

State law provides that debt collectors have a maximum amount of years they can legally sue you for debt they think you owe. This is different than collections.

A debt collector can bill you forever, but a debt collector cannot sue you in court to collect beyond the statute of limitations period. But again, a person needs to use this as a defense in court for it to be effective. When that statute of limitations period expires, the debt collector will lose if you defend using the statute of limitations. Use this as a defense and get your lawsuit dismissed. If it applies, it works!

Currently, the statute of limitations for almost any type of consumer debt in Massachusetts is six (6) years (MGL Chapter 260 Sec. 2)  In Rhode Island, it’s different.  Under Title 9, in Rhode Island, the statute of limitations for contracts and open accounts (credit cards), is ten (10) Years.  (RIGL 9-1-13(a))

In legal terms, a debt that has exceeded the statute of limitations is also called a “time barred” debt. When, exactly, the statute begins (or begins to toll), is different for different debt and for different state laws.  For credit card debt, typically the statute begins to toll from the date you made your last payment. You can find more info on Time barred debt defenses in Massachusetts in the online Mass law library.

There may be other legal arguments about the statute of limitations, like the conflict of laws and the significant relationships test. But essentially, the statute of limitations for most debt in Massachusetts is six years from the date of the debtor’s last transaction, or payment, on the account. Ask your attorney, if you have any questions and want to know if this statute applies in your case.

5. Sue the Debt Collector, Big Time

If a debt collector has violated any part of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), you may be able to sue them and could get a money damage award.  Consumers can successfully sue for violations of the debt collections practices act and are entitled to statutory damages of $1,000, plus punitive and economic damages.

This is where debt collection law suits can be actually quite enjoyable, for me anyway.  For you, maybe not so much.  As a lawyer, this is what I’ve been trained to do.

There’s nothing wrong with finding violations. Holding debt collectors to the higher standard they are called to perform is the right thing to do. Holding their feet to the fire, so to speak, is what’s best for consumers. This is why it’s not a bad idea to hire a lawyer to file a well-drafted answer to the complaint and attend court with you.

6. Explore Bankruptcy, the Fresh Start Option

If the debt you have is more than you can manage or the debt you are being sued for is large, it may make good sense to talk to an attorney. A good bankruptcy attorney will help you discover whether or not filing for bankruptcy is an option for you.

Filing for bankruptcy will keep you protected by the automatic stay, which will halt any and all debt collection efforts being made against you. If you are thinking about filing bankruptcy, talk to an attorney quickly. Don’t wait until the day before you are supposed to be in court. Lawyers can’t typically file bankruptcy paperwork the next day. That’s not how bankruptcies work. Bankruptcies are very paper-work intensive and tedious. To find out more read Bankruptcy, the Easy Way Out, Really? 

While it is possible to successfully defend a debt collection lawsuit, it’s often very difficult and emotionally charged. If the debt collection agency is successful in court, they can get a judgment entered against you. This, in turn, would allow the collection agency to garnish your wages or even go after your bank accounts or place liens on your home, vehicles or other property.

I tell all my clients that debt collection law suits are like traffic tickets. It never pays to ignore them. Reply to the summons. Go to court. What do you have to lose? But better than just “winging-it,” speak to a good bankruptcy and debtor defense lawyer first. Some law offices like ours, offer a free first consultation. When you hire a good debtor defense lawyer to help, there are virtually a hundred or more different defenses that can be used to protect you against garnishments and attachments.

Currently, we are taking defendant clients for debt collection law suits. Our first consultation is free. I’m always happy to meet new clients and am willing to work around your schedule. Exploring your best options with an experienced attorney can’t get much easier. This is only one way we are transforming the way people do business with lawyers.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.com or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We can not stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2017 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Bankruptcy, credit card debt, Debt, Debt Collection, Financial, Foreclosure, Hiring Counsel, Law, Lawsuits, Legal, Massachusetts, Massachusetts law, practical stuff, Rhode Island, Student Loan Debt, Trending, Uncategorized

Tricky Short Sale Deficiency Judgments

Short Sale KeysTricky Short Sale Deficiency Judgments

By Attorney Ginger Kelly

Agreeing to a short sale may seem like the best way to avoid foreclosure in many situations, but what happens to the money owed, after the short sale?

Quite often homeowners think short sales are the perfect solution to a difficult situation, the silver bullet, so to speak. The bank agrees to accept a sale price for less than the mortgage amount and presto, foreclosure averted!  But the problem with this is, a year or so after a short sale is completed, the mortgage lender can (and often will) seek a deficiency judgment against the former homeowner.

What is a Short Sale?

A short sale is when you sell your home for less than the total debt balance remaining on the mortgage. The sale price is “short” of the full debt amount. The short sale process involves the mortgage lender agreeing to accept the sale proceeds and release the lien on the property and then, the proceeds of the sale pay off a portion of the mortgage balance. Short sales are one way for borrowers to avoid foreclosure.

What is a Deficiency Judgment?

A deficiency is when a foreclosure sale doesn’t produce enough funds to pay the mortgage debt in full. The amount of the deficiency is the difference between the amount of the mortgage debt and the foreclosure sale price. A deficiency judgment is a judgment that the lender may obtain from a Judge, giving the lender the right to collect the deficiency from the borrower.

In a short sale situation, for example, if a homeowner sells their home in a short sale for $200,000, and the amount owed on the mortgage was $250,000, then $50,000 would be the deficiency amount. The lender could get a judgment from a Court Judge for the amount left owing and then some. This includes not only the $50,000 deficiency, but interest, other costs and sometimes attorney’s fees.

Deficiency Judgments in Massachusetts and Why are They So “Tricky?” 

Massachusetts is one of those states where a lender is permitted to seek a personal judgment against a borrower after a short sale to recover the deficiency amount. The tricky part comes in when, in general, once the lender gets a deficiency judgment against a borrower, the lender may collect this amount by using things such as a wage garnishment, bank account levy or by placing liens on titled property, like automobiles and motorcycles.

In Massachusetts, after a short sale, the lender can choose to do one of the following two things about the deficiency:

  1. The lender may choose to forgive the deficiency amount and issue to the borrower a Form 1099-C (Cancellation of Debt), which reports the deficiency as taxable income to the IRS. If this happens, the borrower (former homeowner) will have to pay taxes on the additional income this brings in the year they receive the 1099-C.  For most people, who were struggling to pay their mortgage, this causes tremendous hardship.
  2. The lender may choose not to forgive that part of the debt that has not been covered by the sales price and keep the right to file a court action to obtain a deficiency judgment.

If you are a homeowner and are thinking about negotiating a short sale with your mortgage lender in Massachusetts, it is very important to negotiate with your lender before you agree to a sale, to have the deficiency forgiven.

How Can I Avoid a Deficiency Judgment Following a Short Sale?

There are at least four ways to avoid having to pay back the deficiency.

  1. Negotiate a Waiver of the Lender’s Right to Seek a Deficiency Judgment

When a homeowner finds it necessary to sell their home in a short sale, it is important to try to negotiate with the mortgage lender and ask them to approve not only the short sale, but to a waiver of the right to seek a deficiency judgment. If your lender agrees, this provision must be included in the short sale agreement.  That means, always get the waiver in writing.  The short sale agreement must expressly state that the transaction is in full satisfaction of the debt and/or that the lender waives its right to the deficiency.

  1. Make a Settlement Offer

The second option homeowners have is, if the mortgage lender does not agree to waive the deficiency, the homeowner can offer to settle the deficiency for a smaller amount. Many lenders agree to accept a smaller amount because collecting a deficiency is expensive and typically takes a long period of time.  It’s easier for lenders to accept a reduced lump sum, rather than going through the expensive and lengthy legal process to try to collect.  A homeowner can also negotiate to repay the reduced deficiency debt in installments, over time.

  1. Hope the Lender Won’t Sue for the Deficiency

If the homeowner was not successful in negotiating a waiver of deficiency or a reduced deficiency payment plan, the mortgage lender will likely call and send collection letters stating that the deficiency amount is owed. Collection letters typically come from a lawyer’s office or a collection agency.  However, without taking the homeowner (borrower) to court and getting an actual deficiency judgment, the lender cannot levy any bank accounts, garnish wages, or place judgment liens on other property the borrower may own.

To get a deficiency judgment, the lender must file an expensive lawsuit. Many borrowers, who are forced to complete a short sale of their homes to avoid a foreclosure, are judgment proof.  This means that they don’t have much money, wages or other property (assets) that a creditor can take to pay off the judgment. If a borrower can’t afford to pay the deficiency, there is a possibility that a mortgage lender won’t even bother filing a lawsuit against them.

  1. Declare Bankruptcy

The other possibility is to file for bankruptcy to eliminate the debt.  A Chapter 7 bankruptcy would totally discharge the deficiency relieving the borrower of the entire debt. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy will require a payment plan for 3 or 5 years to pay a portion of the total amount owed. Bankruptcy may also be the most pro-active way to alleviate the tax problem before the lender issues a 1099-C.  Income taxes are not typically discharged in Bankruptcy unless they are very old and a borrower can’t retroactively discharge a recent 1099-C tax debt.

On the other hand, if taxes or the deficiency are all the borrower owes, bankruptcy may not be the best option.  However, Bankruptcy may be something to consider when the borrower is facing a lot of debt they can’t pay, or when a borrower needs to eliminate the possibility facing a tax burden they simply can not afford to pay in the future.  To find out more about whether or not Bankruptcy is really the easy way out, click here.

September 14, 2017

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The Law Office of Ginger B. Kelly is now accepting new clients.  Call and schedule your first appointment.  We are a small law office offering your first confidential consultation, absolutely free of charge.

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ABOUT ME:  Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture.

To find out more, visit, www.attorneykelly.com, visit us at Ginger B. Kelly on Facebook or feel free to call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE:  Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet.  Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other.  We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney.  Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice.  Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2017, by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved.

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Filed under Bankruptcy, Chapter 7, Debt, Debt Collection, Deficiency Debt, Financial, Financial Planning, Foreclosure, Law, Lawsuits, Legal, Massachusetts, Massachusetts law, Mortgages, practical stuff, Short Sale, Uncategorized