Utility Shut-off Solutions

Attorney Ginger B. Kelly

Good advice from Attorney Ginger Kelly, licensed since 2004

Utility Shut-Off Solutions

by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., January 11, 2019

I’ts that time of year, again.  The time when utility costs sky-rocket into the netherworld of bills you wish you could pay, but can’t.  But wait, don’t be too hard on yourself.  There are a few solutions to help you navigate this rocky road of uncontrollable utility bills.

Mass.gov has multiple solutions for certain people.  For example, if you live in Massachusetts, and if all the people residing in your home are age 65 and over, your electricity or gas cannot be shut off without permission from the Department of Public Utilities (DPU).  If you are experiencing financial hardship and one of the following applies, your electric or gas cannot be shut off without permission from the DPU:

  • You, or someone in your home, is seriously ill;
  • You have an infant under 12 months in your home;
  • All adults in the home are age 65 or older and a minor child resides in the home;
  • It is between November 15 and March 15 and the utility service is needed to heat your home.

If you meet these requirements and your electric or gas has been shut off, you should call your utility company directly. They will ask for proof of your situation, such as a child’s birth certificate, doctor’s note for a serious illness, or income-based proof of your inability to pay. 

If, after speaking with your utility company, your electric or gas service is not restored, you should contact the Department of Public Utilities at (617) 737-2836 or 1-877-886-5066 (toll-free) or complete their online complaint form.

If your water is provided by the city or town where you live, you need to contact the city or town directly to have your service restored. The Department of Public Utilities has a list of all the water district areas in Massachusetts.

If your water is provided by a company, your water cannot be shut off if one of the following applies:

  • Everyone in your household is age 65 or over;
  • You, or someone in your home, is seriously ill;
  • You have an infant under 12 months in your home;
  • All adults in your home are age 65 or older and a minor child resides in your home;
  • You are a tenant whose landlord is responsible for the water bill.

If, after speaking with your utility company, your water is not restored, you should contact the Department of Public Utilities at (617) 737-2836 or 1-877-886-5066 (toll-free) or complete their online complaint form.

Oil, Propane and Wood (Un-Regulated Utilities)

There are no specific legal protections for utility customers who heat with oil, propane, or wood. However, providers of these utilities are often willing to work with consumers who find themselves in difficult situations. You should contact your service provider directly and if you cannot get your utility restored, you should file a complaint with CARD.

How can I get help making my payments?

You may seek help from your local fuel assistance office if you are having trouble paying your utility bills. You do not have to be unemployed to get help. In addition, utility companies are often willing to work out discount, budget, and payment plans. You can learn about your fuel assistance options here.

How can I find out about my other options?

If you are facing a utility shut-off, including your electricity, gas, water, or telephone due to unpaid bills, filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy may help keep your service connected. Under federal law, if you file for bankruptcy, the utility company cannot change, refuse, or disconnect your service.  Contact an experienced bankruptcy attorney to find out your options.

If you are poor and meet certain income guidelines, you may qualify for legal aid.  Another suggestion is not to use your income tax return refund check to pay for your back bills, but use it to pay for your bankruptcy and be free from most all of your crushing debt and back utility bills.

At our office, there are a number of ways to pay for your bankruptcy, including using your federal and/or state income tax return refunds.

If you have other legal questions, especially if you are contemplating bankruptcy or dealing with collections or debt collection law suits, Attorney Ginger Kelly is now accepting clients in the Dudley, Webster, Sturbridge, Fiskdale, Southbridge, Saundersdale, Oxford, North Oxford, Charlton, Charlton Depot, Auburn, Leicester, Rochdale, Spencer, Brookfield, East Brookfield, West Brookfield, North Brookfield, Warren, Brimfield, Wales, Palmer and Holland.  We can explore whether or not bankruptcy is the easy way out for you.  Our office is a quiet and comfortable place to talk, and a free pot of coffee will be waiting for you when you arrive.

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ABOUT ME: Attorney Kelly is an attorney in good standing, licensed to practice in both the Federal District and State Courts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Her law practice is focused on consumer debt, finance, bankruptcy and District Court matters. Attorney Kelly is experienced in both criminal and civil trial work. On a personal note, Attorney Kelly enjoys writing and other things, like conservation and agriculture. To find out more, visit our website, or call us at (508) 784-1444.

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NOTICE: This is an Advertisement. This post is not legal advice. Consult your attorney. Attorney Kelly does NOT provide legal advice to anyone via social media or anywhere over the Internet. Any and all electronic posts and writings, by Attorney Kelly, does NOT establish any type of attorney-client relationship, whatsoever, neither perceived, actual, material, implied or other. We cannot stress enough, if you need personal legal advice, always see your attorney. Do not rely upon Attorney Kelly’s posts, writings or any Internet information on websites or social media for your own personal legal advice. Seek legal advice and representation from your own personal attorney.

Copyright © 2018 by Ginger B. Kelly, Esq., all rights reserved

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Filed under Bankruptcy, Chapter 7, Collection, credit card debt, Debt, Debt Collection, Empowerment, Filing, Financial, Financial Planning, Legal, Legal Rights, Massachusetts, Massachusetts law, Massachusetts town ordinance law, payment, practical stuff, Uncategorized, Utility Bills, Utility Shut-Off

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